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Potted Trees

 
Brandon Greer
Posts: 264
Location: 1 Hour Northeast Of Dallas
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I've been wanting to plant trees but since my land is not developed yet I don't know where I can plant anything permanent. But I recently read something about some small trees which were planted in pots - I think one was a lemon and another was a small banana tree. I'd really like to try this. What all fruit and nut trees can be grown small and portable like this?

Do these trees face the same issues as other trees, like insect and other problems? Being so small I would expect they would be much more manageable.
 
Lydia Pfalfav
Posts: 10
Location: Middle TN, 6b
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You might want to try some Dwarf Citrus. I bought 2 trees this past summer from Four Winds Growers & they're doing quite well. I ordered a Kishu Mandarin (3 yrs) & a Meyer Lemon (3 yrs).
They have a variety of other fruit trees that you can check out too. They have concise care guides as well.

I've also bought a bunch of bare root trees from the Arbor Day Foundation. (-Various cherries (decorative & edible), thornless honey locust & a shrub that I'm having a complete brainfart on the name at the moment... ^^; )

ETA: I also bought a Ceylon Cinnamon & a Goji plant from Logee's. They also have some other fruit plants as well as TONS of indoor & tropical plants. I LOVE this site for my houseplants & unusuals.
 
Johnny Niamert
Posts: 268
Location: Colo
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I would use fabric pots, instead of regular plastic pots. They allow for air-pruning of the roots. This lets the roots fill the soil better; and leads to less root circling, binding, and the need to re-pot.
 
Mary Saunders
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I've grown citrus in pots for over 30 years in Oregon, where we are now having a bit of whiteout.

I have to bring them in and out. A dwarf grapefruit is my oldest. I don't remember the variety name, but it was the only dwarf grapefruit you could get her back in the 70's and 80's. This is the most wonderful tree. It flowers like crazy when I bring it in for the winter. I have fruit on it now, but its greatest feature is its wonderful flowers.

I have a Bearss lime, second oldest. It bears, to bear out its name. The most delicious fruit. Flowers are delicate and can hardly be noticed compared to the fragrance and size of the grapefruit flowers.

I have had my tangerine since 2003. It was my indulgence when I got laid off from my job in that year. Its fruit I eat like an apple, whole. The cat has broken its branches, but I taped 'em up and it keeps going.

I have a red banana also. Every time I have some major problem, I feel sorry for myself and get a tropical tree.

I need to just move to Belize, which I am planning to do. I'm getting too old for this moving trees in and out. Besides, I need more bwaaaaa.

 
Brandon Greer
Posts: 264
Location: 1 Hour Northeast Of Dallas
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Thanks for all the info. Question: Do these trees eventually outgrow their pots and either need to be planted in the ground or die? If so, is it possible to get seed or clone the trees to start anew from the original plant? I'm trying to move towards not having to rely on outside inputs as much as possible.
 
Mary Saunders
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My grapefruit has been re-potted at least once. I'm not sure I have every re-potted the lime. The tangerine came in something small, and I put it in a bigger pot--same with the banana.

Bear in mind, the Japanese bonsai citrus. If you buy a dwarf, they can take root-pruning, if you keep the tops in proportion. I have not done that myself, but I have seen this in pictures.

For the citrus, I recommend top-dressing with coffee grounds, which my mother did in Florida with her in-ground trees. What happens here is that when they are outside, coffee-loving creatures, such as earthworms, will get in the pots. They till and aerate, sort of. Citrus are pretty heavy feeders, but mine have gone long periods with just coffee grounds and the rinse-outs from dairy and non-dairy milk containers. They need phosphorus, which they can get from rinse-outs. There may be times I have given them iron pills also.

I have friends who have tried these without as much success as I. I don't know why really. Mine have gone long periods without much attention other than water. I once had a baby squirrel come on the front porch, get in the grapefruit, and refuse to get out. I dragged the tree outside, and he still refused to get out. They gnaw on the branches sometimes. They do this with an outside fig also. There must be something they need. Anyway, the little guy must have been not feeling so well. One of my cats got him.

Citrus leaves are used in some North African recipes. I have had some of these dishes, and they are delicious. I put the grapefruit blooms in water sometimes. They are so good.

George Washington Carver is said to have said (as quoted by Stephen Harrod Buhner) that if you love something enough, it will give up its secrets. I really love my tropical trees.

Mary
 
Brandon Greer
Posts: 264
Location: 1 Hour Northeast Of Dallas
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Is it possible to get seed and reproduce one of these dwarf varieties? I'm still pretty confused on what plants reproduce the same variety and which do not.
 
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