• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Connecting gas to a clay chimney top  RSS feed

 
mary Bolton
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a gas stove and was wondering if I can hide the vent within a decorative clay chimney pot.

I have the middle one called the edwardian as seenClay Chimney Pots

I haven't read anywhere if you can do this or not do this. Its just for an aesthetic look.

An option if the Edwardian will not work for some reason is using a larger one. I just want to make sure they can vent the smoke right.

Thanks
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 4028
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
174
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Howdy Mary, welcome to permies!

I guess I do not have an exact picture of what you are trying to do.

Are you saying where the vent goes out the roof , you want to hide it within a clay pot?
So the pot will be attached to the roof somehow?
 
Len Ovens
pollinator
Posts: 1452
Location: Vancouver Island
29
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
mary Bolton wrote:I have a gas stove and was wondering if I can hide the vent within a decorative clay chimney pot.

I have the middle one called the edwardian as seenClay Chimney Pots

I haven't read anywhere if you can do this or not do this. Its just for an aesthetic look.

An option if the Edwardian will not work for some reason is using a larger one. I just want to make sure they can vent the smoke right.

Thanks


Wow! these are not cheap! That is an 8 inch tube and i would think your gas stove is smaller than that (4inch flue for gas appliances is pretty much standard) so the gas will fit through fine. Watch the building inspector doesn't come around to find out about the "new fire place" you installed The one thing to watch out for is birds. The pot is open top but most gas tops are fitted with a rain guard/baffle to keep rain and animals out. Gas burns clean enough that the smoke coming inside the house would not be as obvious as in a wood stove if your flue gets blocked by a bird nest. If the stove is just a heater that gets used in the winter, then cleaning it out once a year would be fine, if you use it for cooking, some kind of bird guard should be used.
 
mary Bolton
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes like fitting the metal tub within the clay pot. Also is the rain guard they sell the same thing as a bird guard. As you can tell my husband put me in charge of gathering the info. Thanks for the help so far! If we do it after this winter I will put up some pictures. They definitely are not cheap but I have only seen used ones and am afraid to get into the used chimney market.
 
Len Ovens
pollinator
Posts: 1452
Location: Vancouver Island
29
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
mary Bolton wrote:Yes like fitting the metal tub within the clay pot. Also is the rain guard they sell the same thing as a bird guard.

If a sparrow can fit through the hole... it will. Your fist is bigger than a sparrow BTW. (Mine is like a few of them ) You could put hardware cloth around the inside, I would guess. For the size of hole a bird can fit through, look up birdhouse making. It seems when I made one in my childhood, we used a one inch hole.

If you do not use a CO (Carbon Monoxide) detector, I would suggest one for any home with flame heaters, gas or wood, with any kind of chimney. But that is just me.
 
Dc Taylor
Posts: 15
Location: Livermore, CA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This idea is feasible; however, there are a few issues you have not mentioned. Is your gas vent passing through ceiling and roof, or horizontally through the wall? Or is a vent pipe inside a masonry chimney...or a prefab chimney? If it were mine, passing through a masonry chimney, and terminated by an approved rain cover and gas-vent termination, covering the hokie looking gas-vent terminator, the chimney cap, should be done with care. Gas fired exhaust products (the invisible "smoke") do not mix well with clay liners or pots. The excess moisture combined with exhaust chemicals (yes, there are caustic gases produced from natural gas and propane) spall the clay surfaces. Spalling and resulting detritus will eventually plug an unlined chimney, causing carbon monoxide poisoning inside the dwelling. If your chimney is lined with an appropriately listed chimney liner as it should be, then the only remaining problem would be sufficient clearance between your clay pot and the liner terminator...the chimney cap. In any case with this type of installation, you should get a written condition report from a certified chimney professional. Gas vents DO need cleaning from time to time and should be inspected regularly.
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!