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solar powered poultry/sheep/etc netting  RSS feed

 
Betty Montgomery
Posts: 52
Location: Lone Oak, TX
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I want to finely get some chickens and maybe a couple of sheep, possibly even some other poultry to do multiple jobs for me. I want them to mow my yard and possibly some of my pasture, fertilize it and give me chicken eggs and possibly a variety of meat or even cash from selling older, well fed critters. Now for the problem. I know little to nothing of solar powered poultry fencing. Most of what I DO know is from reading those "my stuff is the BEST" bits you find on the web sites of those who sell the things. From what I've read from them I'm assuming I'll need the kind of netting called 'pos/neg' as my area is prone to summer (fall, winter and spring) droughts. Does that kind work with solar panel powered batteries or with batteries at all? I would think it would but I"m not sure.
Also what brand, or company, would give me the most bang for my hard earned buck? It'd be nice if they were also willing to educate a novice.
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
Posts: 3734
Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
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http://www.premier1supplies.com/

In my experience horned sheep don't do well with fencing.
For chickens you need a heavy bird that can't fly if you clip the wing(s) - my did so I switched to a heavier breed.
 
Betty Montgomery
Posts: 52
Location: Lone Oak, TX
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Thanks! I'll check them out!
 
Willy Walker
Posts: 101
Location: Foot of the Mountain, Front Royal VA
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I have been using the electric poultry netting for over a year now with out electric. I have a perimeter fence that is 6 feet tall with wood posts. My chickens were flying in and out daily by landing on the fence post and braces. I'm not sure why I purchased the poultry netting after seeing my birds were not contained by the perimeter fence but I did. It turns out they do not fly over it at all. I have not used electric on it either. It is amazing how well it works. It is useless in the winter when the ground is super frozen, it falls over and the spikes are pushed out of the ground and it is impossible to stand the fence back up until the ground thaws. My dogs were able to learn how to nose it up from the ground and pass under the fence. All in all it has been a great purchase and a fabulous way to maintain my birds.

after looking at google images of wild animals caught in the fence and killed by the electric I will not put electric on it. There was one occasion that my dog was stuck in the fence pretty good and as I was removing the fence from him I thought about the images. I think at the time he was chasing a squirrel and neglected to see or care about the fence.

I know very little about raising or containing sheep!
 
Eric Hammond
Posts: 116
Location: SW Missouri
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chicken hugelkultur solar
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I use electric netting to secure my goats. Its incredibly frustrating to set up, I mean really really frustrating. Its heavy, so you can't lug it around easy(mines 165 ft) the poles do not stick in the ground easy at all, and it will catch every twig and snag on anything an 1/8 inch or bigger. I'm not sure what the previous poster was talking about killing animals. Electric fences do not kill animals, its a high voltage low amperage circuit, I regularly touch mine just to make sure its on, it only psychologically keeps the animals in because they don't understand what it is, they could actually leave at any time with no ill effects if they were inclined to. I use a 6 volt parmac solar charger with my netting. Works good but if I were to do it again, I would not waste money on netting its too big of a pain. And around here, I have to watch out for owls and hawks eating my chickens, so I couldnt free range them in a fence anyway, they have to be locked up.
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
Posts: 3734
Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
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Eric Hammond wrote:I'm not sure what the previous poster was talking about killing animals.


I've had a turkey and a rooster strangle themselves on it.
 
Cj Sloane
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Posts: 3734
Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
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Eric Hammond wrote:Its incredibly frustrating to set up, I mean really really frustrating. Its heavy, so you can't lug it around easy(mines 165 ft) the poles do not stick in the ground easy at all, and it will catch every twig and snag on anything an 1/8 inch or bigger. .


I have been very frustrated with my fencing too. A rubber mallet helps to pound in the poles.
 
ben harpo
Posts: 76
Location: Illinois, zone 6b
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I only get the nets with double spikes on the bottom.
 
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