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Planting Annual Hugelculture Bed on the second year. Preparing the bed?

 
                                  
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Hello All,

I planted a poly-culture hugel bed last year, with good results! It is a large bed, approx 100' long x 4' tall.

MY question relates to planting this bed this spring.
Unlike when the bed was new with fresh dirt, the bed is now harder. Broadcasting the seeds on the surface seems like it will be less productive than when the bed was new.

What do you all do to refresh the tithe your beds each spring prior to planting?
A layer of compost to plant into seems like a decent way to go? Scratching the surface seems seems like a ton of extra work at scale.


Thanks,
John
 
Ted Jurney
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I'll be interested as to the response here. You are about a year ahead of me! Love to see some pix. My understanding with huglekultur and other raised bed techniques is that its about adding and building _up_, so your initial thoughts are probably on the right track. You do much perennials and shrubs or all annuals, or a nice combo? I re-read and see you mentioned polyculture...
Have yet to build mine!

 
Matu Collins
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Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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What do you plan on planting?

On my hugelbeets I have had success with mixing up buckets of water, leaf mold, compost and clover seeds. I let it soak for a couple of hours then spread it on like frosting. My beds are smaller than yours.

With big seeds like squash you can just poke em in.
 
Chad Johnson
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A great cultivating tool which Sepp and his son use for everything is the Fokin hoe. It looks like a bayonette stamped into a hooked hoe. Designed by V. V. Fokin and beautiful for using on hugels or terraces. I recommend letting somethings come back if you don't want to cultivate the whole thing. You can also let the chickens scratch it up. I'm gradually converting my to perennial.

We're making the Fokin hoes on our Spirit Mountain Farm this year called "Swords Into Plowshares." They're too expensive to ship. Check it out..

http://www.spiritmountainfarm.org/blacksmithing.html
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I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
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