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Cutting and Removing Rotting Wood

 
George Meljon
Posts: 278
Location: Southern Indiana zone 5b
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I spent some time working on some one, two, and three (maybe older) year old rotting logs in our woods. It's April so the ground is wet and so are the logs. The chainsaw had very poor effect on these logs. Even four inch logs were stubborn. I did some googling on the topic and there is almost no chatter online about cutting wet logs. WHY NOT!!!!?! Ha, just kidding. Who cuts old wet logs but a loon looking for hugel. Anyway. I may have to pass on the many logs I thought I would use because of their stubbornness. I may revisit this project during a dry stretch this summer, I may not. The woods are easy to navigate while the leaves are not in yet. There is also a slight risk for blastomycosis with these rotting logs when they're being cut. I'm a mild hypochondriac about stuff like that. Tell me I have one in a million chance to contract something and I will be wary! Blasto took an old dog of mine and it's a relevant threat in the ohio valley and surrounding areas when things are wet. Dogs run into it often enough when it floods or perhaps digging. Anyway, wet logs! Who uses them and how?
 
Mike Hamilton
Posts: 82
Location: north end of the Keweenaw Mi.
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George Meljon wrote:I spent some time working on some one, two, and three (maybe older) year old rotting logs in our woods. It's April so the ground is wet and so are the logs. The chainsaw had very poor effect on these logs. Even four inch logs were stubborn. I did some googling on the topic and there is almost no chatter online about cutting wet logs. WHY NOT!!!!?! Ha, just kidding. Who cuts old wet logs but a loon looking for hugel. Anyway. I may have to pass on the many logs I thought I would use because of their stubbornness. I may revisit this project during a dry stretch this summer, I may not. The woods are easy to navigate while the leaves are not in yet. There is also a slight risk for blastomycosis with these rotting logs when they're being cut. I'm a mild hypochondriac about stuff like that. Tell me I have one in a million chance to contract something and I will be wary! Blasto took an old dog of mine and it's a relevant threat in the ohio valley and surrounding areas when things are wet. Dogs run into it often enough when it floods or perhaps digging. Anyway, wet logs! Who uses them and how?


take one of your ''older'' saw chains and file some of the raker down so it takes a heaver cut into the wet log
your going to get strings and chunks coming out of the cut but that does not matter as long as you make 2 pieces out of 1 so its in a size that can be handeled

Mike
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
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