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cryptomeria japonica droppings

 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1969
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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I've come into a windfall of organic material. My neighbor has a bunch of large mature cryptomeria trees (also known as japanese cedar, they are actually a cypress) that drop brown branch ends all over his carefully manicured landscape. He's been hauling them to a mound and burning them every year and is so thrilled that I'll take them.

I can't find much information about the tree and can't find a reference to their dropping lots of material. I'm wondering if they are allelopathic.

What would you do with it? I might make paths with it, mulch large areas, deep litter for the chicken run, try to use it as an attractant for chicken food bugs...right now it's in a big pile.

My only concern is that I live in a place where the invasive plant jungle will swallow anything that isn't mowed or tended. I don't need another big thing to tend and I can't have the asian bittersweet and honeysuckle moving in.
 
Ann Torrence
steward
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Posts: 1188
Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
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I vote for paths if it isn't slippery when wet. Nice paths make the work so much nicer, but I have a hard time devoting organic material to them when the need is so great elsewhere. If I had a bounty, I would splurge it on paths.
 
Acetylsalicylic acid is aspirin. This could be handy too:
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