Less than 15 hours left in our kickstarter!

New rewards and stretch goals. CLICK HERE!



  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Another Kind of Garden - Jean Pain  RSS feed

 
                              
Posts: 63
Location: North West PA, USA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've worked with compost heat and compost but the guru is Jean Pain. I wanted to find his book for years and a few days ago there it was! I'm only on page 10 but thought I should pass it along. It's about a 5 MB download:

http://www.biomeiler.at/explorer/Downloads/AnotherKindofGarden.pdf


Jeff
 
              
Posts: 238
Location: swampland virginia
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
thanks for the link. Found some other interesting stuff on the site too. always good to have extra reading material.
 
Chelle Lewis
Posts: 424
Location: Hartbeespoort, South Africa
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nice one, Jeff! Much appreciated 

Chelle
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
found the book interesting, definately different environment than i have here in Michigan but useful information none the less

many many years ago we had a lot of large aspen trees removed from a small area of our property and when they removed them they left all the tops and parts that they didn't want in large heaps all over our woods..the aspens of course regrow in a matter of a few years by the gobs, as they sprout about 100 trees from every one cut..so the woods had regrown in no time..but those piles of leaves and brush were left for wildlife and left to rot..

since that time..about 20 years ago...those piles have turned into rich earth, about 5 acres of rich earth..

at this time I am trying to decide how to use our forest area, a lot of the dead and dying aspen trees (short lived) need to be removed, there are also ash, maple, oak and cherry as well as some other types of trees in the mix..but mostlly aspen.

I have thought of removing some of the parts from the large piles of compost and using it on our  garden, but i don't really want to remove too much from the woods ..we do ocmpost here on our other areas of our property..but i can see that removing some of this rich compsoted soil might be a benefit to our more cultivated part of our property

i ahve been ina process of reforesting the previously cultivated parts of the property we own, as i felt that the open land wasn't as useful as the forested areas..and we have also been building wildlife corridors on our property for the wildlife to have cover from woods to woods..forming small glens and forests on the property and in our yard as well as hedgerows with eidible and non edible tress shrubs and vines which now extend from our woods across the two cultivated acres to the road where the wildlife can cross into swamps on the other side of our road.

our property being n ow a wildlife corridor makes it a very interesting situation as we have the most amazine interaction with wildlife  year around
 
                              
Posts: 63
Location: North West PA, USA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's curious that Jean Pain made humus and not compost. The difference seems to be that humus last a long time where compost keeps on rotting, for a lack of a better word.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humus


Jeff
 
Chelle Lewis
Posts: 424
Location: Hartbeespoort, South Africa
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Interesting differentiation. Never considered it before.

Chelle
 
Kirk Marschel
Posts: 58
Location: Minnesota, USA (Zone 4b)
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Does anyone still have a copy of this? The link no longer works, but I'd love to read it!

-Kirk
 
Eric Markov
Posts: 100
Location: Bay Area CA zone 9
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Here's a link I just googled, looks like a very interesting piece.


http://burlingtonpermaculture.weebly.com/uploads/4/2/8/9/4289790/anotherkindofgarden.pdf
 
Kirk Marschel
Posts: 58
Location: Minnesota, USA (Zone 4b)
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Eric Markov wrote:
Here's a link I just googled, looks like a very interesting piece.


http://burlingtonpermaculture.weebly.com/uploads/4/2/8/9/4289790/anotherkindofgarden.pdf


Thanks! I wish I could find a hard copy some day, but I'm glad I can start reading it now.
 
Watch the full PDC and ATC from home. As much or as little as you want: http://kck.st/2q6Ycay.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!