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Syringa or Serviceberry?

 
E Reimer
Posts: 52
Location: The dry side of Spokane, USDA zone 6ish, 2300' elevation.
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My neighbors are giving me mixed identifications of this tree. It grows all over the land we just bought. Most people seem to think it's a Syringa, but judging by the pictures in the Audubon book it looks more like a serviceberry. I know both are native to this area (Eastern Washington). We just moved here last fall, so we haven't seen any fruit yet.

open flowers></a>

Opening Buds></a>

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whole tree></a>

 
Denis Huel
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Definitely serviceberry (Amelanchier). Saskatoons (as they are called here) make my favorite pie.
 
Jd Gonzalez
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Location: Virginia,USA zone 6
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Definitively Serviceberry.
 
Miles Flansburg
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I was wondering about that cuz it doesn't look like the ones I have. Then I looked at this and learned that there are different species.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serviceberry
 
E Reimer
Posts: 52
Location: The dry side of Spokane, USDA zone 6ish, 2300' elevation.
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Now this is blooming. The photo shows one in our yard, but they're all over the woods as well. This looks more like what my book says is a "Mock Orange" or "Lewis' Syringa" Philadelphus lewisii Is that right?

s2></a>

S1></a>
 
Denis Huel
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Actually the flower clusters (racemes) look suspiciously like chokecherry (Prunus virginiana).
 
E Reimer
Posts: 52
Location: The dry side of Spokane, USDA zone 6ish, 2300' elevation.
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You're right. Here is a better photo of the blossoms. It looks exactly like the Prunus virginiana photos on Google.

s5></a>

s6></a>
 
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