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Tetradium Daniellii - Bee Bee Tree  RSS feed

 
Peter Hartman
Posts: 176
Location: springfield, MO
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Is any one growing this tree? It sounds like it may be good forage for bees when most other things are done in late summer. Does any one know if this tree fixes nitrogen?



 
Ann Torrence
steward
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Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
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Interesting that it is in the same plant family as citrus. Wonder what the honey tastes like.
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
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Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
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Where'd you get the data? Looks like an interesting database.
 
Peter Hartman
Posts: 176
Location: springfield, MO
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Crt Jakhel
Posts: 171
Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6a
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Hi, here's a late reply.

Tetradium Daniellii is also called Evodia hupehensis, you might find more info under that name in Google searches.

We have 15 young trees growing at our farm. The eldest is in its 5th vegetation and will, I believe, flower this year. I do hope everything works out as advertised for the bees. Presumably it is a *very* good provider of nectar and polen, not just covering the hungry gap but actually allowing honey collection (provided of course that you have a sufficient stand of those trees vs. the number of your beehives).

It is not critical to provide permanent moisture, the tree can take some drought. We've had two and a half months without rain in 2015 (Z6 continental climate) and I watered them maybe twice during that time. They are however all heavily mulched with grass clippings.

As the text says, no particular disease / insect problems. It also does not seem to be a vole favorite.

It does not, to my knowledge, fix nitrogen.

It grows easily from seed which is usually readily available on Ebay. It is a good idea to keep the seedlings in a frost-free place during their first winter.

I've seen an about 6 m (about 20 ft) tall specimen in a nursery in Austria. It was... impressive

There's a beekeeper / nursery man in Germany who has dedicated at lot of time to this tree, here's a page on his site with further info: http://www.immengarten-jaesch.de/Insektenfreundliche_Pflanzen.html - he also carries some special supposedly early- and late- flowering varieties, stretching into June / September (in Z6 or 7). I've ordered some but they are still very young so I can't provide any practical confirmation yet.

I very much hope I will be able to post photos of flowers in July.
 
Peter Hartman
Posts: 176
Location: springfield, MO
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Thanks for the update. I will keep an eye on this thread. I hope to see some flowering pictures in a few months.
 
Lance Kleckner
Posts: 123
Location: West Iowa
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Another positive seems to be that deer don't like browsing on its stinky leaves, at least the deer around me.
 
Crt Jakhel
Posts: 171
Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6a
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Our evodia trees took a direct hit from a late frost during the last week of April... But it seems that all of them will recover. Not sure about having any flowers this year though.
 
Crt Jakhel
Posts: 171
Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6a
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A year later - this year - we were again struck by a late frost in late April which came on top of the entire month January being sub-zero which is unusual. (Cold spells even down to -20 C are normal but not an entire month.)

It was probably the freezing January that did the most damage. It froze a 7-year Violetta (English Brown turkey) fig to the ground and half of the young evoidas got rebooted as well. Most (sadly not all) seem to be coming back but if these weather surprises keep happening they're not going to get anywhere anytime soon.

So I would call this a sensitive plant in Z6, at least the first 3 years or so (better to err on the high side).
 
Pamela Richards
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Thanks for that information about the cold. I live in a temperate Mediterranean type climate here in Australia.
We don't get a huge amount of frosts but it has been very much cooler than usual this last year.
I will probably use straw bales to protect the trees for the first few years. First I just have to find the seeds or trees out here.
Very very strict quarantine on plants out here but for our own safety. Appreciate the information Crt Jakhel.
 
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