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Water tank on the Hill

 
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hey,
I'm putting a water tank at the top of the hill. The well pumps at 1.5 gal/min. (rain water will be later) The tank will be almost 200 feet above the pump. I concerned about too much pressure in the line and it causing a leak later on. I can't find an equation online to check.
Sometime in my PDC course I heard the equation of height to water pressure. I know how it applied to diving and the pressure there. Is that the same in a PVC/ABS pipe? Does the pump has a pressure rating that we need to limit it to in order to maintain a fully function water system?
We need to trench across a small (currently/seasonally) dry creek. Is there a good way to lessen erosion, protect the pipe and the creek as we increase the hydrology over the next many years?
Links would be great too!!
Thanks all, Peace and blessings
 
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Location: western pennsylvania zone 5/a
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hi troy,

One PSI is equal to 27.7 inches of water column
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_i_convert_inches_of_water_to_psi

200 ft x 12 in = 2400 in
2400in / 27.7 = 86 psi "head"
this is the amount of pressure the pump needs to lift the water straight up

there will also be head friction losses for piping
diameter of pipe, type of pipe, length of pipe, elbos and other fittings all add to the pump requirement
fortunately, the internet has come thru and provides a calculator to do the math

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/hazen-williams-water-d_797.html

adding these two together will give you the "total dynamic head"
the pipe has a pressure rating on it
your pump must be able to deliver the required volume 1.5 gpm @ ___ tdh (see pump curve)
using a larger pipe ie, 1 1/2" instead of 1" can make a big difference (play with the calculator)

good luck

 
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