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using clover as green mulch  RSS feed

 
Justin DeVico
Posts: 30
Location: northwest vermont zone 4
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So I'm starting to cover crop with white clover. What techniques do I use to plant in between and not have the clover inhibit my plants like tomatoes and what not.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1359
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Hopefully you are using white dutch clover they only get to a max height of 8 inches wirh no cutting.
So your 2 to 6 foot tomato plants should not have to compete for light.

You plant in green mulch the same way you plant in 4inch woodchip mulch, aka create a opening in the mulch by completely removing it. Sticking the edible seed/transplant in the soil.

 
Justin DeVico
Posts: 30
Location: northwest vermont zone 4
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Yes it is dutch white it was called by another name(i forget the exact name) but they sold it as dutch white. That's what I assumed but was unsure. What about stuff like carrots and lettuces. Or do they not tolerate nrt compete well with the clover.
 
Michael Vormwald
Posts: 154
Location: Central New York - Finger Lakes - Zone 5
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I haven't done it, but to sow small seeds I would suspect you need to make a furrow in the clover. For large seeds like squash, cukes, pumpkin etc., you might be able to drill into the clover and mark with a 'stick'. Just another thought....you might want to try a small bulb planter to take out a plug of clover to plant into the soil.

Justin DeVico wrote:Yes it is dutch white it was called by another name(i forget the exact name) but they sold it as dutch white. That's what I assumed but was unsure. What about stuff like carrots and lettuces. Or do they not tolerate nrt compete well with the clover.
 
Daniel Palacios
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im curious to the nutrient exchange that clover has with the soil. I know it fixes nitrogen with the air but how much nutrients are tied up with the clover plant when its living, and how much when its living and flowering/seeding? Also i have some success with clover planted on compacted clay soils, and using a manual push mower to chop and drop the clover. This way the clover is droped in place with no fossil fuels used except for manufacturing the mower. Also to be noted, grass going to seed and mustard green going to seed was just pushed over and stood back up after the mower was pushed through. Maybe a mustard/ clover combination could be a nice cover crop/ green mulch.
 
Mike Hamilton
Posts: 82
Location: north end of the Keweenaw Mi.
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we are using the ''white clover'' for cover crop on the new hugel mounds to stabilize the hill and attract pollinators. also chop n drop
we have several wild hives around here some were's and they come to visit wen the clover in the lawn is flowering,so I figure they could use more food
as for planting seed we just broad cast it on the hills and move it to plant the annuals

Mike
 
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