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Where to start encouraging more diverse foraging on my land?  RSS feed

 
Ghislaine de Lessines
Posts: 203
Location: Vermont, annual average precipitation is 39.87 Inches
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I've only just started getting a good idea of what is available to my on my own land. It is a typical New England forest that I suspect was once cleared for sheep. So far I have found most of the spring forage plants mentioned in Arthur's video, plus maples, hickories, cattails, burdock, and white pines. I hope to run across morels and pheasant back mushrooms at some point. I probably have fiddleheads too but I need to learn to identify them. In the spring foraging video, Arthur mentions placing the wild leek seeds in the hole left behind when harvesting the bulb. I like that suggestion to ensure continuity of the plant but I am wondering if there are forages that I could encourage or even bring in to increase my options.

For example, my in-laws have oaks in their woods a couple of towns over that I would love to introduce here. I'm curious to know if there might be a reason why I shouldn't. It has been speculated that the reason we don't have any is due to the history of this land having once been cleared. Are there other plants that I might consider introducing as well?
 
Daniel Kern
Posts: 197
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Increasing the biodiversity of your system is always a good idea. It seems to me that introducing oaks is a good idea. Yesterday I watched the man who planted trees and was inspired greatly.

After watching the movie I would say that planting anything is a good idea. If it grows then awesome, and if it dies then it just wasn't meant to be there.

The more that you know about your environment the better equipped you are to interact with it.

This may help with
plant identification

This is your
ecoregion

this plant list contains some plants of interest to you.

in this book you can get some good ideas. (hint: use the book preview to see the plant list in the index)

An extremely useful tool that I just discovered you can do a state search for plants
 
allen lumley
pollinator
Posts: 4154
Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
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books fungi hugelkultur solar wofati woodworking
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Ghislaine de Lessines : I think I sprained my tongue trying to sound out your name Yes, I am confident that you will be able to grow deciduous or hardwood,
trees virtually any where on your property you want ! There are a few places to look on your In-Laws property for transplantable seedlings, as the best time to
transplant seedlings is in the early spring before the hard buds start to loosen and swell, or in the Fall, you have a large time window allowing you to find, preserve
protect, and transplant your deciduous trees !

Look around their property at fence lines and boundaries, near old foundations and out buildings, stone piles and near wood storage area even the wood chopping
block, places where hardwood tree leaves gather in deep piles or windrows and are left undisturbed - no weed wakers or Scythes used !

I even have a special place that I check twice a year, spring and Fall, check your house gutters for an accumulation of dirt, roofing stones, composted bird poop,
and leaves and sticks that can be a near perfect place for small Hardwood Seedlings !

I can make an easy comparison between the conditions inside most house gutters and your typical Aqua-ponics with soil setups! Remember too that the leaves and
twigs found there are performing the same Water holding sponge effect as the wood buried in a Hugel Mound !

A few words about Ostrich Ferns, First, Ferns are heavy metal accumulators mostly within the rootball but it is important that you Do not pick them near blacktop or
other heavily traveled roads ( Ferns "follow' water courses, so do Roads ) also KNOW or find out the history of the land, no mine workings or Tailings, or
downstream from an Ancient Tannery !

Ostrich Ferns have a very prominent celery stalk groove, and have a dark brown thin translucent cap that initially adheres closely and then dries up and separates
easily

Another tell tale sign Is the Secondary growth of the spore producing frond in the late summer early fall, it has the same celery Stalk groove, is initially green and
looks the most like a feather, more so after the rest of the Fronds die back and it is a Now- Brown lone sentinel telling you where to find next years crop !

I can be driving down the road at a legal 55 MPH, and spot these Spore fronds and re-mark a map in my head exactly when and where I have spotted them !

A little bit of New England History ! On May 10th, 1775 Ethan Allen and his Green Mountain Boys Seized Fort Tyconderoga from the British, a little piece of history
to lock in your mind as a Proud Vermonter! ( Oh Yes, There was an other guy there - A Benedict Arnold !) May 10th, or a little earlier is when to start looking to
gather fiddle heads ! Though not what I would call most timely, this will help you prepare for fall and next spring ! Big AL
 
Rebecca Treeseed
Posts: 6
Location: New Mexico
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My favorite way to increase biodiversity is to set up a bird station of some sort. Amazing numbers of seedlings will show up around a birdbath or underneath a suet station.

I once had 14 acres of Texas... with coastal hay. Walked all around and only found about 15 species. Distributed 4 pounds of black seed sunflowers to invite the birds' help. Within 3 years I had a list of 300 species (corner of 4 ecosystems).

Suburbia? A birdbath will provide endless volunteer seedlings.
 
allen lumley
pollinator
Posts: 4154
Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
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Rebecca Treeseed : Elegantly simple, thank you for posting Big AL !
 
Bill Bradbury
pollinator
Posts: 684
Location: Richmond, Utah
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With all the rain you get, you might not have a conservation district in your area, but I buy a couple hundred bare root forage/wildlife plants every year from my local conservation district. The cost here is about $1/plant and they always have a nice selection of edible/medicinal trees and shrubs that are appropriate to my climate. Now we have forage all year 'round with out leaving our place. Pheasant Backs can be grown quite easily by adding spores gathered from wild mushrooms into the chainsaw's bar oil when you cut trees for hugel beds. Leave the stump sticking out a bit and in a couple of years you'll have mushrooms well into summer, maybe even longer there. When I find Morels, I throw the stem butts into saw dust from my shop but I have had no luck with growing my own Morels.
 
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Video of all the permaculture design course and appropriate technology course (about 177 hours)
https://permies.com/wiki/65386/paul-wheaton/digital-market/Video-PDC-ATC-hours-HD
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