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Korean Bush Clover

 
Kirk Hutchison
Posts: 418
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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   Anyone growing this? I recently got some seeds. It is leguminous, has edible leaves, and grows rapidly (and is perennial). Will post pictures once the seedlings get bigger. It is also known as Lespedeza bicolor.
 
Kirk Hutchison
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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No one?
 
Nicholas Covey
Posts: 180
Location: Missouri/Iowa border
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I had never heard of it so I looked it up. Wikipedia lists it as an invasive and "unpalatable" to native wildlife due to high levels of tannins in the leaves.

I'm not trying to be negative, but I fail to see how with high tannin in the leaves it would be considered edible any more than oak leaves. I also looked into using it as a forage or for grazing, and netted nothing.

If there is more merit to it as an edible or as a forage plant, (if you know something that I wasn't able to find, you might share that as well) I would be interested to know, so keep us posted on how it turns out.
 
Kirk Hutchison
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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  Well.... I have seen some bad press on it, but the seed company is extremely reliable, so I believe their reports. Will post once I try it.
 
Nicholas Covey
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Location: Missouri/Iowa border
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Well like anything, there is a hype of a sort. I am curious to find out what your finds are.
 
Crt Jakhel
Posts: 131
Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6a
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bee dog forest garden
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Nicholas Covey wrote:Well like anything, there is a hype of a sort. I am curious to find out what your finds are.


This thread has originated in the time when dinosaurs walked the earth.

Nevertheless, I'd like to known whether anyone has since tried to grow lespedeza bicolor, particularly in zones 7-6-5.

From what I've read it seems to bloom in late summer / autumn which means it could be of particular interest for our bees. This seems to validate this point: http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?194636-lespedeza-for-honey-production

Also, it can supposedly freeze to the ground in Z6 and lower but still regrow in time to flower.

This is however all theory.

Any practical insights?

 
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