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Kombucha and soil  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 1361
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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I am brewing kombucha, this Japanese tea thing.
There is often too much. Would it be somehow useful in the garden? It contains bacteria but they might die immediately.
Has someone tried to feed this to animals?
 
steward
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Angelika Maier wrote: Has someone tried to feed this to animals?


My mother chucks the old scobie layers to the chickens-they love it.
I imagine the bacteria wouldn't survive in another environment
but I'd say they, and all the other kombucha goodies would make a tasty meal for good ol' compost bacteria
 
Angelika Maier
pollinator
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And the kombucha tea, does it do any good to the soil?
 
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Location: North-Central Idaho, 4100 ft elev., 24 in precip
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I would imagine that the kombucha tea might be good for making the soil more acidic in the short term. You might even be able to use if for an herbicide if you let is sour for a while (like vinegar). You could probably even preserve some of the microbial life if you mixed it with biochar and then applied that concoction to the soil. If you don't let your kombucha ferment for a while you could run into problems with ant though.
 
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