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Fermented veggie brine as soil amendment  RSS feed

 
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So my wife is a bit addicted to fermenting. We were talking about ways to reuse the brine and we saw on a website a suggestion to use it as an ingredient in bokashi. I have no desire to ferment a bunch of trash in a bucket, so I'm wondering if it would be useful to just add it to the garden directly. The brine does have a bit of salt, 5 Tbsp to 2 qts of water, so it may need to be diluted a bit? Anyone have any ideas or opinions on this?
 
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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I wouldn't add it directly to the garden.
I'm all for the complex mineral salts from seaweed/diluted seawater,
but plain old sodium chloride is nasty stuff, even diluted.
My old fermenting brine goes on the compost- the salt's bound to be a bit rough on the microbes there,
but they cope and any salt is diluted to basically nothing.
The lactobacillus may survive in the compost, I don't know.
 
John Brownlee
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I guess without knowing all the full profile of bacteria in the brine, it would not be useful for brewing a "compost tea".
 
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Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
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My ferments are done with unrefined sea salt; I plan on highly diluting the residue and spreading it around to capitalize on the trace minerals; some of them may be beneficial even at homeopathic levels.
 
Leila Rich
steward
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Victor Johanson wrote:My ferments are done with unrefined sea salt; I plan on highly diluting the residue and spreading it around to capitalize on the trace minerals


Um, yes, Victor kinda has a point and I should have clarified
I'm working my way through a load of free refined salt and forgot that there are other, better kinds!
John if your ferments are done with unrefined sea salt I'd ignore me, dilute the brine hugely and water the garden with it.
And it'd be great if you reported results back here-one day I'll use up that salt...
 
John Brownlee
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Yeah it's kosher salt that my wife uses. She's looking for a less expensive source for sea salt so I'll wait to use it as a soil amendment.
 
garden master
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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You could dilute it, I'd make one of her batches into a 5 gal pail of liquid then use that to water the compost pile. you could also add a couple of tablet form multi-minerals which could reduce the amount of sodium by binding up with the ions in the pickeling solution. It might take a while to use up the pail of diluted solution, but it would work to recycle any goodness in that brine.
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