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Help deciding which tropical climate trees to plant as living fence poles

 
Juan Izquierdo
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Quick question!

I need to make a fence and was thinking of doing something similar to this (picture)...

http://imgur.com/JCER4Na

Not sure what tree to plant (tropical climate). Was thinking of doing leucaena... but I think a tree with thorns would be better...

... Any thoughts/experience/recommendations?

Thank you so much in advance,
10494593_805987062775369_6842699829282606449_n.jpg
[Thumbnail for 10494593_805987062775369_6842699829282606449_n.jpg]
 
Dave Burton
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Location: Greater Houston, TX US Hardy:9a Annual Precipitation: 44.78" Wind:13.23mph Temperature:42.5-95F
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Here are some semitropical to tropical trees that I think would interest you:

The Silk Floss Tree:



The Hercules Club Tree:



The Honey Locust Tree:



The Kapok Tree:



The Pejibaye Palm:



The Pochote Tree:



Mwahahahahaha! Last, but most intriguing of all is THE SANDBOX TREE:




This is not a tree, but I think it is pretty cool and has potential to be a fence:
Firethorn Shrub


 
Juan Izquierdo
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holy moly Dave!

Thank you so much!

I really appreciate the helP!

that sandbox tree is SCARY LOL
 
Su Ba
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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I use some nasty sticky plants here in Hawaii to deter trespassers. A double or triple row of ornamental pineapple is nasty. Mix in some Hawaiian poppys and it can be quite a prickly barrier. I use this combination down at my seed farm and nobody has tried to walk through it yet. Across the front of the seed farm along the fence I have blue agave. People don't want to tangle with them either. Quite nasty. Then there is bougainvillea. It takes a few years, but it can make in impenetrable barrier. People use it here all the time. My horse won't try to bust through it, it's so thorny.
 
Juan Izquierdo
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The Honey Locust Tree/Bougainvillea are the winners for me!

Thank you so much for the help!

I ordered the honey locust tree seeds and have access locally to the bougainvillea
 
Dave Burton
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Location: Greater Houston, TX US Hardy:9a Annual Precipitation: 44.78" Wind:13.23mph Temperature:42.5-95F
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Since you have chosen the Honey Locust, I think it would be advisable to read up on these three threads located here, here, and here about the Honey Locust. Also, depending on your seed source, you may have been given the thornless variety; did you check to make sure it was the thorny kind?

This is a short video describing honey locusts and black locusts:


According to Wikipedia, Honey Locust shares similar rot resistant properties as black locust. In addition, it comes with its own natural nails and tire-poppers, too.
 
Juan Izquierdo
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Dave!

Thanks for the threads... because I did NOT think about the obvious... The vehicle tires!

Better to know now... rather when I blow a tire lol...

 
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