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Extinction Garden

 
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I noticed recently that my state (PA) has a alot of plant and animals species that are locally extinct (extirpated)......Since I don't have the means to bring back grey wolves and wolverines to this state I was thinking of trying with extirpated plants in a garden type setting....many of which are available online. I think this would be great for adding diversity and for providing additional forage for pollinators. Anybody try something like this?
 
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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I've never tried that, but while I lived in New Jersey I found a pink and white lady slipper growing in the boggy area of my land. I found out from a friend whose husband worked for NJ Deot of Forestry that the plant was seriously endangered. So I intentionally propagated it. But I never told any officials about the plant because it would have severely impacted my use of my land. I never bragged about it either. But the people who purchased my place were excited by the idea of the plant thriving there and understood the various reasons for keeping mum about it. Last I heard there were a goodly number of pink & white lady slippers not only on my old land, but the new owners had spread them into the adjacent bogs owned by the State. Kinda cool.
 
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Location: New England
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I have done this with some plants. They can be of good value but the habitat they grow in is used for development or farming.

Wild Senna MA (E)
Culvers Root MA (SC)
Indian Grass MA (E)
Butternut (E)
 
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Location: Gladstone, Missouri, USA; Zone 5ish
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If you have a Master Naturalist chapter in your area (similar to but separate from Master Gardeners, run through the local extension office) this is one of the activities that they usually work on, although they would focus on public lands instead of private.

They might be a good source for getting seeds or plants for things that are rare but native to your area.
 
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