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southern garden chores: august?  RSS feed

 
Madden Elout
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I'd love to see this continue.

Perhaps I should start a new post entirely?
What is everyone doing this time of year in Georgia?

While I'm at it: has anyone seen viburnum trilobum(american cranberry) for sale? I'm looking for smaller plants to save on cost and plan for next year.
 
wayne fajkus
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Texas

I'm fencing in sheep paddocks. Get one made every week or two until I have 4 to rotate them on. Watering the paddocks they came off of.

I'm spreading horse manure on the newly seeded pasture for the horses. Figure not just the fertilizer benefit, but the shading and moisture retention will help. Probably no rain for a couple of months so I'll lightly water it in so it won't run off (slight slope)

Not much gardening. Tomatoes are still producing good. I can get a dozen every couple of days from one heirloom (black cherry).

I do have sweet potato that are Vining nicely.

we had a lot of rain , but right now it's hot. 100 degree days are just starting.
 
John Elliott
pollinator
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Start your seeds!

For warm weather crops like watermelons and winter squash, there is still time to get a harvest. If you start peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, this is the time of year when they germinate quickly and take off. If you keep them in pots, you can move them to a greenhouse or other protected location and maybe keep them going well into the winter.

For cold weather crops, like brassicas, they also germinate quickly in the hot weather and as it cools off into the fall they can put on some impressive growth before they go into stasis some time in December or January. Things like chicory and onions don't slow down that much during the winter, and you can keep cutting them for salads or the soup pot.

I think fall is a better time for gardening than spring in the Deep South. All too often in spring, you can get hit by a late frost and have to resow, only to watch winter turn into summer with no spring in between and your little seedlings burn up. But by planting in August, you get the speedy germination of warm soil, and the first frost is at least 3 months off. Go through all those seed packs that you stuffed into a shoe box in the closet and get them started. Comes November you can decide which ones look good enough to try and overwinter.
 
Madden Elout
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John Elliott wrote:Start your seeds!


Indeed.
My pansy and aster seed just arrived. I'm going to get them going in flats right away and so more later.
 
Diogenese simpson
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w eel here in brownwood its too hot to sow anything , soil temperatrure in the shade is 92 degrees , the only thing growing well is black eye peas , even the ocra is wilting , for the last ten days we have had 100 + days and upper 80,s nights with 10 percent humidity real tough for the plants . fall planting is dificult the grasshoppers are hitting their peak now and last year i found a couple eating a cabbage on christmas day ,they are the bane of my life , though i do not have to feed the chickens this time of year , they just get fat !
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
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