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Opinions on nitrogen fixing trees in the nw - inspired by Stefan Sobkowiak of Miracle Farms  RSS feed

 
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Looking to build a similar orchard to Miracle Farms http://youtu.be/3riW_yiCN5E

We are in Boring Oregon on 5 acres.

Planning to use the following root stocks:
Geneva 30 http://www.cctec.cornell.edu/plants/GENEVA-Apple-Rootstocks-Comparison-Chart-120911.pdf

Pyrus Old Home x Farmingdale 87

Prunus Myrobolan 29C



My questions is what kind of nitrogen fixing tree should I use? I'd like to stay in the 8-12' range.

Any and all help is greatly appreciated.
 
steward
Posts: 3422
Location: woodland, washington
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I like the Elaeagnaceae. autumn olive, goumi, seaberry, silverberry, &c.

pea trees (Caragana spp.) and Lespedeza bicolor can work well, too.
 
gardener
Posts: 7564
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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My brother Jeff, turns every existing tree on his Mexican farm into a nitrogen producer by pruning them and covering them with beans and other nitrogen producing vines. Most are trash trees that will eventually come down. Starting from scratch, there are many good choices. As a means of clearing land and getting immediate results, this is really working for him.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1703
Location: Western Washington
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I really like golden chain. and red alder of course. Golden Chain has some really beautiful prized hard wood and lovely flowers which the bees love.
 
Posts: 16
Location: Portland - Alsea
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I suggest Sitka Alder, You probably already have it on your property if it's rural.

NW native, even the leaf litter contains a high amount of N.

I am 20 miles SW of Corvallis, thinking along the same lines. my list for N-fixers

Sitka Alder, Siberian Pea, comfrey (ground Cover) and black locust ( for the wood),
maybe Goumi and autum olive if I can find one with decent fruit.

Cheers!

 
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