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Can you identify this tree?

 
pollinator
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I'm watching a Geoff Lawton video where he is touring the forest he put in in Jordan.

The film starts while he is talking about a nitrogen fixing, long living, canopy tree but I don't know what it is. Can anyone identify
the first tree he is talking about in the video?
 
pollinator
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I think it's a Carob.
 
Sheri Menelli
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I am not sure that can be carob. This tree in the video he says is deciduous whereas the carab is evergreen.

Also, he says it is very large - overstory canopy but I read that the carob only gets to 10 m

 
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it doesn't look like carob (חרוב) too me

Maybe there are other species, but i see and eat carobs every day (in Israel) - they look like this:

https://www.google.co.il/search?q=חרוב&hs=N6v&tbm=isch&sa=X

Their leaves are less ordered, larger and more round (or more quare).

But i need a better zoom to identify.
 
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Albizia lebbeck if you listen carefully right at the end of talking about how the Leukina coppices and pollards well then says So does the" Albizia lebbeck." and waves his hand back at the previous tree.
 
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It is a Leucaena. There are many varieties of this nitrogen fixing tree. Geoff mentions Leucaena a canopy tree on his greening the desert original site videos.
 
Cj Sloane
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Geoff introduces the 2nd tree as a Leucaena.
 
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it looks a little like a Locust tree. They are nitrogen fixing canopy tree that are drought tolerant.
 
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