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Show me your desert fence

 
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The fence has 2 walk in gates and 2 16 foot gates.
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Walk-in gate in chain-link fence in the desert
Walk-in gate in chain-link fence in the desert
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Drive-in gate in chain-link fence in the desert
Drive-in gate in chain-link fence in the desert
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Chain-link fence in the desert
Chain-link fence in the desert
 
master pollinator
Posts: 1974
Location: 4b
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My favorite part of this thread is the picture of the lawn mower in the desert :)
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pollinator
Posts: 2286
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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Jon Snow wrote:Last time I went to my cabin I saw about 15 rabbits....at the same time in the same small area! They are like pigeons! I think maybe someone is feeding them because you can get pretty close to the without them running off. I also heard that people kill coyotes and this causes a increase in the rabbit population.



We shoot ours and my son can get close enough to almost put the gun to their heads. I'm thinking rabbits just aren't smart.
 
Jon Snow
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Trace Oswald wrote:My favorite part of this thread is the picture of the lawn mower in the desert :)



Those lawnmowers were there when we got the place. In the Spring believe it or not we do get green grass for a little while.
 
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Hey jon how is your property? If youve harvested any rainwater id love to see how. Visited joshua tree from apple valley ca.. we stayed in a air bnb tiny house. Coffees great
 
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Location: Dolan Springs, AZ (Zone 9a)
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kevin stewart wrote:I use t-posts and barbed wire. While the posts are not that expensive, the cost adds up quickly. I space mine at 25 foot apart and hope to add more in between.It seems to keep the cattle out.I use three strands of wire though in this picture you only see two.

If I get any more cars on my property I can build a fence mad max style.

Chicken wire is what works for me.



Nice fence, I have a 5 acre parcel in AZ and want to put up a barbwire fence too. How far apart are your tposts? How thick are your end posts? Do you you use tposts from end to end or do you have wood posts in between a few tposts?
I need to keep out the cattle, and wonder if the tposts are enough on their own.

THanks!
 
pollinator
Posts: 175
Location: Southeast Arizona, Latitude 31, Zone 8A, Cold Semi-Arid, USGS Ecoregion 79a
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Hey, Eric! If you're trying to keep cattle off your property, be aware there is actually a "lawful fence" description in Arizona. Any less frequently spaced T-posts or fewer barbed wire strands and your ranching neighbors aren't liable for their cattle getting through your fence repeatedly. Here is the relevant statute and a helpful extension document on open range law.
 
Jon Snow
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Nicholas Pulido wrote:Hey jon how is your property? If youve harvested any rainwater id love to see how. Visited joshua tree from apple valley ca.. we stayed in a air bnb tiny house. Coffees great



Whats up Nicholas, the property is doing well. I live in LA and drive to the desert on weekends. So far I am digging ditches to move the water away from my cabin to a natural wash. I started to plant mesquite trees near that wash. I figure they grow next to washes in the wild so it might be a good idea to plant them in that location. Even though it rains about 4-6 inches a year we get lots of water fast since we have a hill at our place. I've been busy planting native beavertail cactus around the entire perimeter of my fence. The rabbits dont eat them and I can get plenty of cuttings from the native  beavertails that grow on our place. After growing different types of trees I have had the best success with mesquites and palo verde trees.  Sometime in the spring im going to dig a pond to hold more water.
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Here is a picture of the small ditches I dug to have the water flow away from my property and fence. At the bottom of the ditch I will dig a pond to hold the water.
 
Jon Snow
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Another view of the ditch which leads to a wash. I also dug up a small swale and it collects water. Since I'm not there full time I haven't seen it fill up during a rainstorm. I know it works because when I arrive about a week after a storm hits, the swale will have a little water in it. Lots of grasses and weeds grow in and around the swale. I'm just experimenting at the moment. I'll post more pictures as I progress. Joshua Tree is a amazing place!
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