• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Dan Boone
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
  • Mike Barkley

"The Great Global Warming Swindle" movie a swindle?

 
pollinator
Posts: 418
Location: Upstate SC
35
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like searching through classic literature looking for references to where cold sensitive crops are being grown at the time.  If the world is getting warmer, why you can't grow oranges outside without protection in Natchez, Mississippi?  In Mark Twain s 'Life on the Mississippi', published in 1883, a travel log where he documents his trip down the Mississippi, he mentions Natchez as the northernmost location where you can grow oranges outside without protection and that from that point on south he mentions seeing orange trees growing at the various towns and plantations he visited. Today you can't grow oranges outside without protection north of New Orleans.  Mark Twain had a reputation of being a very astute observer, so if said oranges were growing in Natchez, they must have been growing there at the time.

In another book 'The Escape of General Breckenridge ' documenting the escape of Confederate secretary of war General John Breckenridge and his military staff ahead of union forces at the end of the Civil War by travelling the length of Florida to Cuba, they mention collecting coconuts from abandoned homesteads on Merritt Island, a location too far north and too cold to grow coconuts today, and which today are only found north to Jupiter Inlet.  The book also mentions the methods they used to manage biting insects in the days before DEET.  The references in both of these books would indicate a warmer climate in the mid to late 1800's than we have today.

If the world is getting warmer why has the east coast citrus industry have to keep moving south.  In the late 1800's it was centered in southern Georgia to nothernmost Florida. By the early to mid 1900's it was centered in the region between Gainesville and Orlando, then after the 1970's cold snap moved south to the region between Orlando and Lake Okeechobee where it is centered today.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4328
Location: Anjou ,France
240
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I can grow oranges here in France but they would not be the modern commercial kind are you sure you are not mixing the two . This I would expect Mark Twain was correct this may not indicate a change in temperature but of commecial operation .
Plus coconuts are often swept hunderds of miles from where they are grown and collected on the beach by the poor of many countries far to cold to grow there own .
 
pollinator
Posts: 1559
Location: Denver, CO
58
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I like searching through classic literature looking for references to where cold sensitive crops are being grown at the time.  If the world is getting warmer, why you can't grow oranges outside without protection in Natchez, Mississippi?  In Mark Twain s 'Life on the Mississippi', published in 1883, a travel log where he documents his trip down the Mississippi, he mentions Natchez as the northernmost location where you can grow oranges outside without protection and that from that point on south he mentions seeing orange trees growing at the various towns and plantations he visited. Today you can't grow oranges outside without protection north of New Orleans.  Mark Twain had a reputation of being a very astute observer, so if said oranges were growing in Natchez, they must have been growing there at the time.

In another book 'The Escape of General Breckenridge ' documenting the escape of Confederate secretary of war General John Breckenridge and his military staff ahead of union forces at the end of the Civil War by travelling the length of Florida to Cuba, they mention collecting coconuts from abandoned homesteads on Merritt Island, a location too far north and too cold to grow coconuts today, and which today are only found north to Jupiter Inlet.  The book also mentions the methods they used to manage biting insects in the days before DEET.  The references in both of these books would indicate a warmer climate in the mid to late 1800's than we have today.

If the world is getting warmer why has the east coast citrus industry have to keep moving south.  In the late 1800's it was centered in southern Georgia to nothernmost Florida. By the early to mid 1900's it was centered in the region between Gainesville and Orlando, then after the 1970's cold snap moved south to the region between Orlando and Lake Okeechobee where it is centered today.



For what it is worth, some scientists think there is a connection between a warmer climate and more cold snaps, which would be devastating to perennials. I know here in Denver, the trend has been warmer winters with less snow, but spring frosts are still as late as ever. This is actually very bad for perennials, which are flowering and leafing earlier and earlier, thus getting frozen more and more often in the spring. A few more rounds of this, and the Denver urban forest will die off. I would guess the same would apply to the limits of tropic plants.

A warmer world may be much more unstable.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1793
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
93
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Turner wrote:I like searching through classic literature looking for references to where cold sensitive crops are being grown at the time.  If the world is getting warmer, why you can't grow oranges outside without protection in Natchez, Mississippi?  In Mark Twain s 'Life on the Mississippi', published in 1883, a travel log where he documents his trip down the Mississippi, he mentions Natchez as the northernmost location where you can grow oranges outside without protection and that from that point on south he mentions seeing orange trees growing at the various towns and plantations he visited. Today you can't grow oranges outside without protection north of New Orleans.  Mark Twain had a reputation of being a very astute observer, so if said oranges were growing in Natchez, they must have been growing there at the time.

In another book 'The Escape of General Breckenridge ' documenting the escape of Confederate secretary of war General John Breckenridge and his military staff ahead of union forces at the end of the Civil War by travelling the length of Florida to Cuba, they mention collecting coconuts from abandoned homesteads on Merritt Island, a location too far north and too cold to grow coconuts today, and which today are only found north to Jupiter Inlet.  The book also mentions the methods they used to manage biting insects in the days before DEET.  The references in both of these books would indicate a warmer climate in the mid to late 1800's than we have today.

If the world is getting warmer why has the east coast citrus industry have to keep moving south.  In the late 1800's it was centered in southern Georgia to nothernmost Florida. By the early to mid 1900's it was centered in the region between Gainesville and Orlando, then after the 1970's cold snap moved south to the region between Orlando and Lake Okeechobee where it is centered today.



If you think global warming means that it's just going to be warmer in any given area, I would urge you to read the literature about what global warming actually does.
 
Did you just should on me? You should read this tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!