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Oysters and phonebooks

 
Posts: 45
Location: Bedford, England: zone 8/AHS 2
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What proportion of bleach to water did you use for sterilisation, and am I right in assuming you used chlorine bleach?
 
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One should think twice before growing oyster mushrooms on phone books. Especially Pleurotus ostreatus (the common oyster mush) is able to retain heavy metals when decaying substrates or retaining them even from air. SUch substances are then persisting in our bodies and destroying our health in time. Phone books are full of ink and such substances, ...so you shouldn't grow them on books



 
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Location: Central Wyoming -zone 4
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hugelkultur monies dog chicken sheep
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though i would tend to agree its best to error on the side of caution... do oyu have any validation for this statement?^^
 
pollinator
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Devon, certain aggressively colonizing species of mushroom, including the aforementioned, are now being used in bioremediation projects worldwide, including the Fukishima disaster site. There is a real worry that the mushrooms and other edibles will either be consumed by wildlife and enter the food chain, or be harvested by unscrupulous people and sold to the unsuspecting. www.sciencedaily.com has lots of articles on it. Its so easy, you can even do your own research.
-CK
 
Devon Olsen
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hugelkultur monies dog chicken sheep
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i am aware that the mushrooms will concentrate heavy metals and other toxins, im asking if you have any validation for heavy metals being present in soy based ink?
 
Chris Kott
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One should think twice before growing oyster mushrooms on phone books. Especially Pleurotus ostreatus (the common oyster mush) is able to retain heavy metals when decaying substrates or retaining them even from air. SUch substances are then persisting in our bodies and destroying our health in time. Phone books are full of ink and such substances, ...so you shouldn't grow them on books



If you read the post, Devon, you'll see that no mention is made of soy anything. I don't have any info on the specifics, but I'd be almost as concerned with the bleaches and binding agents used in both paper straight from the tree and recycled material. My guess would be that the more paper is recycled, the more toxic it becomes, until you get to that thinner-than-newspaper-only-suitable-for-phonebooks stuff. Hey, I run a print shop and bindery (true) and those are technical terms (not!).

There are some who consider cardboard and paper and even phonebooks to be safe in a food system, I just don't happen to be one of them.

-CK
 
Devon Olsen
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Location: Central Wyoming -zone 4
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hugelkultur monies dog chicken sheep
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well i was under the impression that pretty much all newspapers were soy based ink, though i dont know anything a bout phopnebooks, being that you work in the industry, is there any truth to that that youre aware of, like i said id prefer to be paranoid then poisonous but i was just looking for validation because i currently have a lot of newspapers innoculated right now lol
 
dan tura
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Well, the best is a scientific proof. Here is a link, google for more scientific articles if you wish

http://www.nipne.ro/rjp/2011_56_1-2/0257_0265.pdf

However, to be informed in this case is crucial because you have to know what is healthy for you. Eating Oyster mushrooms grown on newspaper and books is not a wise choice. Anyway we are here to help each other so I'm happy that I could share this with you guys
 
Devon Olsen
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^ i have to start by saying im no scientist or chemist and though i have basic enough understanding to make some sense of that paper it seems to me to just prove that the mushrooms do collect heavy metals, i did know that, though i appreciate the link, im sure it will help someone out eventually

i just didnt know if newspapers and their inks contain such heavy metals to be collected by the mushrooms in the first place?
 
Chris Kott
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I would love to see shredded paper from newsprint and phonebook sources incorporated into different compost test piles for the sole purpose of doing soil tests on set quantities. That would still only let us detect the stuff we know is bad for us, but it would be something. The main thing is that we don't know, and that which we don't know can kill us. It doesn't matter what exactly is in the paper waste, or what it breaks down to, if you find an alternative to bringing potentially toxic material into your food systems.
-CK
 
dan tura
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Lead was a basic ingredient of ink, but it was banned about 30 years ago, now let's say that ink doesn't contain lead anymore, but contains other chemicals as well, I cannot give you more details on this but I think is important to know exactly. Let's leave the ink aside, let's think about books or newspapers, I'm talking about white paper used to manufacture books and other stuff. Now that paper in order to look white needs to be treated with different kind of substances (generally chemical substances) this could be another concern that we have to take into account.

I used to grow them on cardboard paper that is somewhat more natural than the other stuff mentioned above. But first I used to wash the paper just to get rid of potentially 'bad' substances. Here you can see some pictures of oysters growing on cardboard paper: Oyster Mushrooms Cultivation on Cardboard Paper
 
Devon Olsen
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Location: Central Wyoming -zone 4
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unfortunately i have to think you're right and i'll have to come up with some other way to grow my mushrooms i suppose...
 
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Location: Orgyen
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Oyster mushrooms can also be grown on unbleached toilet paper- probably free of dioxins from the bleaching process or ink chemicals. Some people grow them on spent organic coffeee grounds. However, I grow my oysters on logs and woodchips in boxes. I must admit though, I've had poor luck in trying to get them to fruit on unbleached toilet paper rolls sofar.
 
dan tura
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You should try cardboard too, you'll get good results with that; however, you have to squeeze the paper for optimal humidity and that's the hard part
 
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