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invasive fire spreading plants?  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 1516
Location: Denver, CO
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Permaculture folks tend not to be worried about invasive plants, and neither am I. I think most of the anti-invasive stance is funded by herbicide companies.

I was wondering what the permaculture thinking is on invasive plants which burn easily in drylands. The conventional thinking is that they will totally eliminate the native vegetation, especially cacti and succulents, and need to be treated with herbicide over large areas.
 
Posts: 3366
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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In the midwest, native plants were adapted to fire so I come from a slightly different perspective.

There are places they need to be eliminated for fire breaks. We need to take a few lessons from the Aussies in protecting homes from wildfires and not this "do nothing until it is too late and the RUN AWAY" Mechanical control is best for those breaks around homes. Expensive, but required.

For the larger area, it is the permaculture question "why is this plant advantaged here and how to I success it out?"
 
Gilbert Fritz
pollinator
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Location: Denver, CO
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Yes, here in Colorado most ecosystems are adapted to fire as well. The problems really start in areas dominated by cacti and similar plants, where until the introduction of fast growing winter annual weeds, (mustards, annual grasses) there was not enough fuel load for fires.
 
Yeah. What he said. Totally. Wait. What? Sorry, I was looking at this tiny ad:
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