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Zone 9b (Tampa) Starting a permaculture farm

 
Leon Segler
Posts: 33
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I mean, farm is a bit of an exaggeration, but some food would be nice. It's kinda like a big garden, really. I took some photos, ask me if you want some more.

I'm going to do my best to see what's already growing, so we can with or around what is there. Lots of shade, as you'll see, Oak on one side and house on the other, so definitely want shade loving plants. Seen some white mushrooms, but I think they just went out of season, picture if I see it again. Read that you can take spore prints semi-easily, so I'm up for trying that too(for identification). Around here "grows"* Spanish moss from the trees, it's gotta be useful somehow, right? The area with that big blanket gets flooded with washing machine water... I don't know what that does to plants so. There's a pile of tree limbs, collected from the palm out front and from the two oaks, i also stole some from a pile of demolition ruble, the house(no people there for awhile) behind us got demolished and they cut a lot from the trees. Totally up for some hugul beds, made one already, just randomly and with little thought I admit, it's oak logs at the bottom->Spanish moss->dirt/soil->a ton of vines from the trees in that abandoned house and on the oak next to the shed, it's an experiment I guess. What do tree limb companies do with all those limbs? Can't plant much trees, unless you guys think it won't mess with the house. I don't have a large budget or anything, so I'm just trying to see what I can do now.It's a little messy I'll admit, even more reason to turn it into a natural farm.

This is pretty much ground zero though, I don't have much knowledge or much supplies, but I'm willing to learn. So yeah, what do you guys think?
http://imgur.com/a/ywKzS#0 <-pictures so far.
 
Leon Segler
Posts: 33
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I should mention I've been a lurker here for awhile, just now starting to do something.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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With the extra shade that you mention you could true some cool season veggies, like cabbage, kale, collard green, brocolli, etc same goes for switch chard and spinach.

The mint/thyme/oregano/sage family is also pretty good, they are good as herbs/seasoning and they will help protect your veggies, they are normally pretty aggressive but maybe in the shade they will be just right.

The onion/garlic family are also pretty hardy too.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
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