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cob countertop  RSS feed

 
Curtis Budka
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Location: Southern NH zone 5b
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I like the idea of being able to add a slight slope to a countertop to allow excess liquid to drain into the sink. The easiest way to do this that I can think of is to use cob. But cob can't get wet. What could you cover the top with to water proof it?
 
Kate Michaud
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Location: Ontario, Canada
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Hi Curtis.

Try using food grade oils. The cob should soak it up, would require several coats, and drying time in between. A test sample would be best effort.

K
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Hello Curtis,

I can think of ways of making cobb into a countertop, yet as a natural designer and builder, I am not sure it is the best plane or most ergonomic logistically and best application of materials. A Tadelakt lime covering could be forced to work yet again...not the best application of materials and technique. As for oils, they would have to be a "true drying oil" and not all food grade oils are as they just will not polymerize properly to achieve a durable coating.

So, for the sake of being positive toward your goals, if you really are crazy for the "cobb" and have dreams of flowing organic shapes and the like. (Which I do like myself when designed well as it is more forgiving for 'new' builders than perhaps woodworking may seem.) Here is what I would recommend.

Put together a good kitchen design, assemble a solid wood armature to hold the cobb, and place large stone slabs or clay tile into a mortar bed of lime for the countertops that see the most heavy traffic. A flax, tung, or related oil finish for the rest may, with experimentation give you a finish that is workable if cobb is the way you really want to go and try for...

Good Luck,

j
 
Cj Sloane
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Curtis Budka wrote:I like the idea of being able to add a slight slope to a countertop to allow excess liquid to drain into the sink. The easiest way to do this that I can think of is to use cob.


I think there are easier ways to add a slight slope to a counter top than cob. Lots of easier ways. I used to have a weird counter top sink combo made of metal with groves that drained into the sink.
The one I had kinda looked like this:

Oh look, here's a modern version:
 
Peter Ellis
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Location: Central New Jersey
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Not sure why cob would come to mind as the easiest way of doing this. Installing any countertop calls for some careful leveling in order to get it to work well. Just a little fiddling with that careful level gives you a gradient toward the sink, however you made the countertop .
 
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