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Using pine tree druff (soil under pine trees)  RSS feed

 
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Was just wondering if the soil under pine trees is okay to use in my lasagna layered garden. i have a grove next to my apartment and it seems like really high quality stuff to use as a layer or two. Anyone know if this is bad for the garden in anyway?
 
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Mix in a bit of powdered limestone and it's going to be fine. What are other materials you are going to use?
 
joseph dooley
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Ive used anything i can get my hands on for free/decent price. Started with cardboard and coffee grounds for the bottom layer, then grass clippings, then leaves, then rabbit manure+wood shavings, then hay, then a layer of pine druff, more manure, hay. and repeated. I've read from different sources telling me that the druff is both acidic and i need to amend it and that its completely fine to use without amending it. I'm getting my beds in now(in Oregon) so I dont plan on planting for another few months so im wondering if i really have to treat it with lime to raise the ph?
 
Aljaz Plankl
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With the materials you have you don't have to, but it's good to use compost in drills or planting holes at time of sowing or planting in spring.
 
Aljaz Plankl
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Similar to what you are doing, we say gibanica instead of lasagna gardening.
Turn on English subtitles with third button in bottom right corner of the youtube player.
 
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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awesome stuff, If you want to grow blue berries, you have it made in the duff.
I use sacred cedar tree (a juniper actually or aromatic cedar, common name) duff, mostly since I have not one pine tree on my land (hardwood forest).
The acidity of this duff is perfect for getting my blue berry growing mound to the correct 5.5 acidy, the bushes love their mound.
 
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