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NZ divaricating plants (and other fun stuff)

 
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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divarication is not unique to NZ but we have loads more than anyone else, across many plant families.
The 'why' is a bit mysterious. Was it to confound the moa? Cope with the wind? Debate rages on

I love everything about divarication.The word is cool enough, but the plants are awesome!
Twigs going every which-way at right-angles, with some token leaves-
as far as I'm concerned, the plants have some serious style.
They also prefer poor, sandy, dry soil and wind just makes them look cooler
As a bonus, many of them also have tiny but tasty berries for me and the birds.

Coprosma propinqua
muehlenbeckia astonii

Does anyone have local divaricating plants?
 
pollinator
Posts: 306
Location: North Central New York
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I have never heard of the term before this. Fascinating. This growth pattern is new to me and I would be interested in hearing if it occurs anywhere else.
 
pollinator
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Location: northern California
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Every continent and major island will have plant anachronisms, adapted to resist herbivory by, or to disperse seeds with, animals that are now extinct. Read Connie Barlow's "Ghosts of Evolution" and you will never look at the landscape the same again!
 
Leila Rich
steward
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Here's another common-in-NZ-virtually-nonexistant-elsewhere growth habit:different adult and juvenile forms

juvenile lancewood (Pseudopanax crassifolius)

adult lancewood
 
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