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Teaming with Microbes  RSS feed

 
Posts: 91
Location: PNW
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So I just finished reading "Teaming with Microbes" and "Teaming with Nutrients". The books were good overall for information and the science wasn't too dry. One thing I was hoping for but was missing was a large plant list specifying whether the plants like bacterial dominated (alkaline) or fungal dominated (acid) soil. It's obvious that most annuals are bacterial and most perennial, shrub, woody plants are fungal but there were ones he mentioned such as potatoes that liked a fungal/acidic soil.

Has anyone come across a nice large list of plants specifying bacterial vs fungal? I feel it would be helpful for designing.
 
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Easiest way I know I learned from Elaine Ingraham--where did the plant grow natively, Field or Forest?

Most fruit (strawberries, blueberries, etc.) were from the forest floor--they like fungal soil. Most things that came from native grasslands like bacterial soil.
 
Kris Arbanas
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For sure, I've heard that as well with strawberries. Funny thing is, I was interning at a farm this past summer and he had tons wild strawberries growing in his native "annual" grasslands. So maybe strawberries are actually borderline fungal/bacterial and not fungal dominant?
This is why I'd love to get my hands on a solid list displaying what end of the spectrum most plants are on.
 
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Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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I love these books, very accessible and info-dense. I have never seen a list like this, I wonder if anyone has ever done the research. So many topics in permaculture are ripe for scientific examination.

If there is a list I'd like to see it too!
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Kris Arbanas wrote:For sure, I've heard that as well with strawberries. Funny thing is, I was interning at a farm this past summer and he had tons wild strawberries growing in his native "annual" grasslands. So maybe strawberries are actually borderline fungal/bacterial and not fungal dominant?
This is why I'd love to get my hands on a solid list displaying what end of the spectrum most plants are on.



Now that you mention it, most of the wild fruits (whether vine, cane/shrub, or tree) are found at the edges. Is that because of the soil? or the light? or the interaction with animals?

Keep in mind that soil is hyperlocal and 3 dimensional. You can be bacterial in spot X and fungal a foot away (or down).

I also don't know any plant, even annuals, that doesn't do better with a mycorrhizae application. I think of it like some plants are more tolerant of a lack of fungal activity than others.
 
Kris Arbanas
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If I remember correctly, he said that 95% of plants associate with mycorrhizal fungi so yeah pretty close to everything.
 
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