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Pear fire blight

 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
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Hey guys. All of my trees I just planted have been doing well. I bought most of them from Stark Bros. I starting noticing that my hardy asian pear was not leafing out as well as the rest and it started to get blackened leaves. I suspected fire blight so I took a picture and sent to Stark. They agreed and will replace the tree which is the good news. I have a couple of questions though.

1. Has anyone else ever had problems with fireblight? I know how to get rid of it, but I haven’t been able to talk to anyone with solid info on prevention relevant to zone 6.

2. I bought all kinds of trees this year including apples and pears, and only this one pear tree had it. The tree was bare root and was a young whip, which leads me to believe it already had the disease since all the others were fine. Is it possible that only this tree got the infection from my property?

3. Has anyone used any Permaculture approved methods for keeping this in check? Stark has a fungicide called Serenade. Here is the info on it http://www.serenadegarden.com/labels-msds/con-label.pdf. The EPA isnt sure how it will affect honey bees just yet.

Thanks guys.

PS. I feel like im always asking for help and not providing enough help. That is mostly due to my inexperience with Permaculture, I hope everyone understands and I am looking for ways to interact more by offering help.

 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
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bump bump
 
Emerson White
Posts: 1206
Location: Alaska
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Cut and burn and clean your tools, that is the only method to get it under control. Goodluck!
 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
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Thanks Emerson. I do know that part of it. I was kinding hoping for more information from others who have experienced fire blight. Here are the questions:

1. Has anyone else ever had problems with fireblight? I know how to get rid of it, but I haven’t been able to talk to anyone with solid info on prevention relevant to zone 6.

2. I bought all kinds of trees this year including apples and pears, and only this one pear tree had it. The tree was bare root and was a young whip, which leads me to believe it already had the disease since all the others were fine. Is it possible that only this tree got the infection from my property?

3. Has anyone used any Permaculture approved methods for keeping this in check? Stark has a fungicide called Serenade. Here is the info on it http://www.serenadegarden.com/labels-msds/con-label.pdf. The EPA isnt sure how it will affect honey bees just yet.
 
Emerson White
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Location: Alaska
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That is B. subtilis according to the label, I'd be really surprised if that hurt honeybees, you can already find it everywhere in the world where it gets up to 50 f. I would be a little surprised if it worked too. Typically fireblight prevention is done by soaking trees in streptomycin. A more permie method would be to avoid winter pruning, so as to avoid watersprouts which stay green and susceptible for a long time.
 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
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Now we are talking! Its funny you mention the winter pruning because that is what everyone recommends to prevent it, you are saying the opposite! Not pruning makes sense because of the water sprouts and I imagine open wounds...
 
Emerson White
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Location: Alaska
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Editing error, that should have been don't prune in late winter (early spring as well). After the sap starts to flow pruning in late winter is a recipe for huge watersprouts that will stay soft and vulnerable for a long time.

I never got the hang of the whole four seasons thing, here we have 5-6 months with at least 6 inches of snow on the ground.
 
John Alabarr
Posts: 78
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I posted this in another fire blight thread:

"I talked to a Horticulturist one time and he recommenced pouring milk on the infected tree. I did it and it helped. Something to do with the lactobacteria."
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
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