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dynamic accumulators for mordants?

 
Meryt Helmer
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Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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I am not sure if this belongs here. it is fiber related though and fiber arts related. I was reading about a plant that grows in india (and I am totally blanking on the name) that accumulates aluminum and is used for a mordant with red dyes. on a thread in the compost section of permies someone has asked about composting mullien and someone else posted information on what mullien accumulates and aluminum is up on the top. I am wondering there are any other plants known to be usable for mordanting because they accumulate alluminum or other minerals and also just about plants used for mordanting in general.

Where I live a lot of local fiber artists have started to use sea water as mordant and when they can be found they use old copper pots (usually from candy making) but the pots are very expensive. I have had lovely results with sea water and really enjoy using it for mordanting. has anyone here experimented with growing mordants or also with finding local clay that is mineral rich and works as mordants? I think I have heard some people in other parts of california have found certain clays to work well.
 
Dawn Montague
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Hi Meryt. This article here (https://practicalaction.org/docs/technical_information_service/dyeing_textiles.pdf) names mosses and tea as aluminum accumulators that can be used as mordants, but no real details.
 
Meryt Helmer
Posts: 395
Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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Thank you!
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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I just joined a natural dye group on facebook called The Wild Dyery (an online celebration of botanical colour and textiles). Someone just posted about this very thing that addresses your topic.
...here is a quote from Jane Deane
this weekend my dye class helped me in an experiment with bio-accumulators of aluminium and using natural tannins as mordants. For protein fibres we used alum as a control, symplocus - already established as being a reliable source of alum - camellia leaves and club moss. The club moss, suppied by Debbie Bamford, was for experimental purposes only as the plant is rare and should not be used without careful consideration for its source and scarcity.


She wrote more and is answering questions about the process...it was easy to join and is an interesting group to follow.
 
Meryt Helmer
Posts: 395
Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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Thank you!

Judith Browning wrote:I just joined a natural dye group on facebook called The Wild Dyery (an online celebration of botanical colour and textiles). Someone just posted about this very thing that addresses your topic.
...here is a quote from Jane Deane
this weekend my dye class helped me in an experiment with bio-accumulators of aluminium and using natural tannins as mordants. For protein fibres we used alum as a control, symplocus - already established as being a reliable source of alum - camellia leaves and club moss. The club moss, suppied by Debbie Bamford, was for experimental purposes only as the plant is rare and should not be used without careful consideration for its source and scarcity.


She wrote more and is answering questions about the process...it was easy to join and is an interesting group to follow.
 
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