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Beginners guide to fungi growing? Especially as a decomposer?

 
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Location: Yorksire - North England
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Hi all.

I read this forum with interest, but I don't know the basics of fungi growing - can anyone suggest a good place to start? Either put some notes here, some links, a video, a book etc.

As a family we don't eat mushrooms for food - just not a fan of the taste - but I guess my neighbours wood. I am more focused on fungi as a method of decomposition - I currently have horrific soil, and looking at exploring all sorts of methods to improve it.

Many thanks

Steve
 
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Tradd Cotter wrote a book called Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation. IT' s really great. Before that, the standards are also two by Paul Stamets: Growing GOurmet and Medicinal Mushrooms and Mycelium Running. There are also numerous videos on You tube, for example.
john S
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Location: Shenandoah Valley, VA
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King stropharia is a good beginner species that chews up mulch pretty quick
 
John Suavecito
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A really good method of improving your soil and developing fungi in it is to place fresh wood chips on top of your soil as a mulch. Don't dig it in. Over time, worms and microbiology will eat it, improving the organic matter in your soil, and increasing the microbiology. You will get mushrooms. Many will not be edible, but you don't care. You just want a healthier, balanced soil, and this is the way to do it over time.
John S
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