• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Anyone in central Florida willing to swap plant cuttings via mail?

 
Sharon LaPlante
Posts: 26
Location: Brooksville, Florida - Zone 9a
1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Depending upon what you want to trade I will mail in a bubble mailer or regional rate box.

I’m in central florida (brooksville) and am looking for the following:

My wish list:

Chaya cuttings
Moringa stenopetala cuttings
Goji berry cuttings
Egyptian spinach cuttings
Seminole pumpkin seeds
Edible canna
Edible hibiscus
Pigeon pea
Discorea alata
Ground nut
Winged bean
Katuk (Sauropus androgynous)

What I have to trade:

Beautyberry (seedlings or seeds)
Elderberry (seedlings or seeds)
Cassia bicapsularis (unrooted cuttings)
Spiderwort (seedlings)
Pineapple sage (root cuttings)
southern blackberry (root cuttings)
coral honeysuckle (root cuttings)
desmodium (root cuttings)
elephant ear babies (not the edible variety)
dayflower (root cuttings)

I also have these seeds on ebay - http://my.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?MyEbay&gbh=1&CurrentPage=MyeBayAllSelling&ssPageName=STRK:ME:LNLK:MESX.

Thanks for your consideration.
 
Amedean Messan
pollinator
Posts: 928
Location: Melbourne FL, USA - Pine and Palmetto Flatland, Sandy and Acidic
33
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Sharon! I live on the east side of Florida but I wanted to shout out to a fellow neighbor. Just moved here so I am starting new. Waiting on a purchase of some acreage before I establish a food forest. Give me a yell and tell me about yourself!
 
Chris Ennis
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am in South Florida, so not sure if that is OK; the climate may be a little different. I have so much Chaya ( Cnidoscolus aconitifolius ), I don't know what to do with it. The branches will grow anywhere I stick them in the ground. They are a non-stinging variety, and very tasty, with a nice crunch even after 12 minutes of boiling. I also have pigeon pea but not much seeding right now. I have 2 Katuks but both are juveniles, maybe ready to clip within the next year. Also, cranberry hibiscus should be big enough to clip within the year.

I can't get rid of the Chaya once I tell people about the Cyanide. If you want to trade some for some southern blackberry clippings, let me know.

--Chris
 
Sharon LaPlante
Posts: 26
Location: Brooksville, Florida - Zone 9a
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Chris,

South Florida is just fine. I just wouldn't want to trade plants from someone up north ... plants always seem to do better when they are within the same range (or as close as possible) ... or at least that's been my experience.

I also have some small katuk and cranberry hibiscus and they taste great! I can't wait until mine get huge so I can harvest as much as I want ... and start some cuttings.

I would love to trade some blackberries for your chaya cuttings. Yes, yes, let's do it! I hope they are easy to root ... I've been having a lot of trouble rooting tree collard cuttings. I'm usually good at that sort of thing but the collards just won't cooperate so I'm hoping the chaya is easier. I have a slight worry about the cyanide issue, but it seems like lots of folks eat it and are still alive ... you included. lol I am assuming it's like plants with oxalic acid ... as long as one don't eat them constantly it will alright on your system.

I've not done this before, but I'm assuming we just send each other purple mooseages to get our information for mailing?

Thanks so much for the offer,

Sharon

 
Frank fank
Posts: 10
Location: Indian River County FL
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi all,

Recently purchased a property in Indian River County on 5 acres. Not there full time yet but planted like a mad man everything I could think of that could survive on its own. Ended up getting almost 1000yards of free wood chips from service crews over the Summer. Been using that to mulch plants and improve soil structure in various areas. Still have tons in piles in the pasture areas. Planted a ton of nitrogen fixers among my fruit trees in mulch: pigeon pea, lab lab, couple types of cow pea, and peanut. Everything is growing well and I learned a lot about my property while doing it all. I understand I'm being vague on many points but that is due to information being irrelevant to the post.

I am new to the area and have zero connections to anyone other than my family. Looking to meet new people with similar interests and possibly trade seeds, cuttings, plants and information. Could definitely use some design input to help utilize resources more efficiently.

Looking forward to meeting and learning from you all.

FL


 
John Weiland
Pie
Posts: 701
Location: RRV of da Nort
22
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
RE: Florida-adapted plants.

I'm looking for something perhaps out of the ordinary. It's not a native plant to Florida....or at least I don't think so, but it does grow wild there. It's called "Mexican Fire Plant", "Fire on the Mountain" or Euphorbia heterophylla and sometimes called Euphorbia cyathophora, also often known as "Wild Poinsettia"....and many other names. See a photo of it here: https://floridanatives.wordpress.com/2010/12/

The plant is raised as an ornamental but has gone wild enough to be considered a weed in certain agricultural locations of the southern US. This plant ranges up even into Minnesota. But here's the problem: Minnesota-adapted seed has evolved pretty good dormancy that is difficult to break artificially. Apparently, seed adapted to more tropical zones does not possess this dormancy and can be harvested and immediately planted for rapid germination. Since I have a greenhouse in which I wish to do this, I'm interested in finding seed that is adapted to southern Florida if possible. Any ideas of how I might be able to get seed of this plant? Thanks!


 
Chris Ennis
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
John, if anyone in South Florida would know where to get that plant, it would be the folks at Mounts. http://websoilsurvey.sc.egov.usda.gov/App/WebSoilSurvey.aspx

 
John Weiland
Pie
Posts: 701
Location: RRV of da Nort
22
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
@ChrisE: I might be missing something, but what is "Mounts" and how does it relate to the link that you provided? Thanks!
 
Sharon LaPlante
Posts: 26
Location: Brooksville, Florida - Zone 9a
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome Frank and John!

Congratulations on your 5 acres in Indian River County Frank. Unfortunately I can provide no design input as my property is mostly huge oak trees and I plant where I can. It would be quite a challenge to have pasture areas to start with. There are many wonderful ideas and articles on this site so I’m sure you will have a great time designing your new place.

John I have seen both of those species of Euphorbia here and there on my property … and both are native to Florida and most of the US. E. heterophylla doesn’t have the red streaks on the leaves like E. cyanthophora. I will keep my eye out for them. I may not be able to get seeds, but I could send you a couple of bare root plants. I haven’t tried it before, but it’s worth a shot. I haven't tried to transplant or share them before. If I come across any I will send you a purple mooseage.

Enjoy your permaculture creating!

Sharon
 
chip sanchez
Posts: 8
Location: Broward, Fl
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi, im in south fl and have some loquat cuttings. i believe they will grow in your area. the fruit is amazing and im willing to swap for some chaya or just about anything really.
 
Sharon LaPlante
Posts: 26
Location: Brooksville, Florida - Zone 9a
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Chip,

I have lots of loquat ... do you have anything else to share? I could certainly share some chaya ... and my longevity spinach (Gynura procumbens) is doing well enough now so I could spare some cuttings of those too. Both root easily in water. Chris Ennis was kind enough to share some of his chaya with me so I finally have more than the two scraggly ones I had. Oh, I also have a couple of small katuks.

Sharon
 
John Weiland
Pie
Posts: 701
Location: RRV of da Nort
22
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
@Sharon: " E. heterophylla doesn’t have the red streaks on the leaves like E. cyanthophora. I will keep my eye out for them. I may not be able to get seeds, but I could send you a couple of bare root plants. "

This would be much appreciated, Sharon, and at this point I'm not partial to one or the other for my purposes. I currently have E. marginata ('Snow-on-the-Mountain') from Johnny's seeds which is quite easy to germinate and grow but something in E. heterophylla and E. cyathophora that could be grown as easily would be ideal. Since these are 'weedy' annuals, I don't think it would be too much problem with overnight shipments of such plants if seeds prove difficult to come by. If you come across some plants, shoot me a P-Moosage and we will go from there. Thanks again!

-John
 
Sharon LaPlante
Posts: 26
Location: Brooksville, Florida - Zone 9a
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sure John,

I can just send them in a bubble mailer and they should be okay. Next time I see some I'll send you a private message and you can let me know where to send them.

What do you use them for ... medicinal ... edible ... just curious.

Sharon
 
chip sanchez
Posts: 8
Location: Broward, Fl
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry Sharon, i dont have much as im just starting out. i do have some avocado seedlings and purple and yellow passion fruit seedlings
 
Laura Zurro
Posts: 1
Location: Palm Bay/Malabar, FL Zone 10A
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sharon, newbie here I have some pigeon pea seeds and would be interested in trading for Seminole pumpkin if you're interested, or could just send you some. I'm still starting out but am lucky to have gotten a bunch from a friend and probably have way more than I need.
 
dan roggenkamp
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Sharon,

We live just north of you. We're just north of Istachatta, right on the Hernando/Citrus county line. (Literally. Our property spans both counties.) We're also right on the Withlacoochee Bike Trail. (Literally again. It's east property line.)

We have a number of Moringa trees and Egyptian spinach (which grew from last year's seed). We also have what I'm guessing is a hard to come by but very hardy red yam leaf. It's a wild Taiwan yam grown for the leaf. Very nutritious, and it thrives in the summer heat. I kept some going in the green house last winter. It's a tropical plant. But it may have come back from the roots. I'm not sure because I planted the cuttings in the same bed.



 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic