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I spend less time working my garden then you spend working your lawn.

 
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Location: Ohio, USA
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I'd like to say that, but I happen to be a garden junky and so I find excuses to go into the garden and touch the earth. I also have never been in one place long enough to have established plants and just benefited from their existence. That said. I think it possible. IF you have your perennials, get some of your annuals to re-seed and organize the garden so that plants get at least some of their nutrients and all of their water without the gardener's assistance, then your left with planting some annuals, harvesting, pruning, and some TLC. Given a lawn needs mowing every week during the growing season, and plants need pruning about once a year, we are down to (in this climate) 13 hours of mowing on a lawn (on average) and 2 hours on the same sized orchard. That means 11 hours of other. However, harvest can take a lot of time, but then again, so does grocery shopping. So, I guess I might not know until it happens. Anyone achieve this bragging right?
 
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Amit Enventres wrote:Given a lawn needs mowing every week during the growing season, and plants need pruning about once a year, we are down to (in this climate) 13 hours of mowing on a lawn (on average) and 2 hours on the same sized orchard. That means 11 hours of other. However, harvest can take a lot of time, but then again, so does grocery shopping. So, I guess I might not know until it happens. Anyone achieve this bragging right?


Well, my half acre lawn is also a 30 tree fruit orchard, so it takes about the same amount of time to mow as a similar sized yard. With the the wood chips around the trees, the actual area that needs to be moved is less than half an acre, but circling the trees with the mower slows things down. Every time I'm out there mowing, I get a little envious of those straight as an arrow orchards that are easy to mow...
 
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