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What is going on with my dying fruit trees?!?!  RSS feed

 
Posts: 17
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Hello

Large number off my fruit trees are dying (apple, plum, pear...) I live in zone 3b and last winter had record low

Thanks

JS
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Posts: 247
Location: Virginia,USA zone 6
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forest garden greening the desert hunting solar trees
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Looks like canker. There are several ways to deal with it. From surgery to pruning and/or a copper fungicide solution.
 
gardener
Posts: 697
Location: Mount Shasta, CA Zone 8a Mediterranean climate
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With just that one picture I would guess Nectria Canker... Make sure that if you do any cutting you sterilize your tools in between each cut. Burning the cuttings is a good idea, too. If you don't want to burn you can try solarizing it (seal it up under a layer of clear or black plastic for a good amount of time in the direct sun) but I don't know for sure that the temps would get high enough to kill the pathogen.
 
Posts: 669
Location: Porter, Indiana
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trees
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Can't really tell from the pictures, but if it looks like the damage is on the same side for all the trees it could be sun scald that has made your trees susceptible to fungal attack. Did the trees have any fruit blossoms this year? The fruit buds seem to be the first things that get damaged by low temperatures and winter kill.
 
Jean-Sebastien Busque
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Thanks for the help.
Damage is on the all the side of trees. over the past 2 years large number of trees have had symptoms but this year it's catastrophic! nectarine, plum, pears, apple, asian pears, apricot, cherries (stella), sea berries all have trouble. Currents(black/white/red), honey berry, elderberry, hazelnut, aronia Berry, cherry cupid and carmine jewel are doing fine. I will do some cutting and burning
 
Jean-Sebastien Busque
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apple tree (red free)
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Posts: 568
Location: In the woods, West Coast USA
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At the Stark Bros. site it says Redfree should only be in zones 4-8. So 3b might stress it in normal years, but an extra cold year would put it at risk for a lot of things, as everyone is saying.

http://www.starkbros.com/products/fruit-trees/apple-trees/redfree-apple
 
Posts: 7
Location: MN, USDA zone 4a
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Jean-Sebastien Busque wrote:Thanks for the help.
Damage is on the all the side of trees. over the past 2 years large number of trees have had symptoms but this year it's catastrophic! nectarine, plum, pears, apple, asian pears, apricot, cherries (stella), sea berries all have trouble. Currents(black/white/red), honey berry, elderberry, hazelnut, aronia Berry, cherry cupid and carmine jewel are doing fine. I will do some cutting and burning



Very few of the trees you listed are zone 3 hardy. Skip nectarines, skip most plums (there are a few that hardy to zone 3 but not many), skip asian pears, skip apricots (they may survive but will rarely if ever produce fruit due to blooming early and having late frosts), skip cherries except for a couple pie cherries, apples may do okay but you have to do your research on varieties...zone 3 winters are a bear. I live on the border of 4a/3b
 
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