Win a copy of For the Love of Paw Paws this week in the Fruit Trees forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Heirloom Watermelon

 
Posts: 9
Location: Virginia Zone 6B
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Bradford Watermelon. Anyone growing these? Are they as good as they sound?

https://knpr.org/npr/2015-05/saving-sweetest-watermelon-south-has-ever-known
 
steward
Posts: 4686
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
1564
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My take on pretty much all heirlooms that were lost and have now been found is that it's mostly about marketing hype. If the fruit tasted as luscious as the ad copy claims, and if they were as easy to grow and generally adapted as they want you to believe, then I believe that they would not have fallen out of favor in the first place. There is currently a lot of hype going around about this watermelon.

I trailed hundreds of heirloom tomatoes, muskmelons, and watermelons in my garden. Approximately 99% of them proved to be unsuitable for my growing conditions, and not just a little. Melons from the deep south don't have the slightest chance of producing fruit at my place. A low-sugar melon grown on my farm beats the taste of a high-sugar absent melon every time.
 
Posts: 1
Location: SE Tennessee
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
They sound great, but they're a little pricy for me ($10/12 seeds). I'm not lacking in heat or length of season, but until they lower the price or I can trade someone for seeds, I'll stick with what I know grows well for me.
 
Posts: 273
12
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Joseph Lofthouse wrote:My take on pretty much all heirlooms that were lost and have now been found is that it's mostly about marketing hype. If the fruit tasted as luscious as the ad copy claims, and if they were as easy to grow and generally adapted as they want you to believe, then I believe that they would not have fallen out of favor in the first place. There is currently a lot of hype going around about this watermelon.

I trailed hundreds of heirloom tomatoes, muskmelons, and watermelons in my garden. Approximately 99% of them proved to be unsuitable for my growing conditions, and not just a little. Melons from the deep south don't have the slightest chance of producing fruit at my place. A low-sugar melon grown on my farm beats the taste of a high-sugar absent melon every time.



I haven't tried the watermelon but the article link clearly said it feel out of favor because it does not ship well.
 
You can't expect to wield supreme executive power just because
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!