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Plant ID

 
Brendan Danley
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#1
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wildflower 2.JPG
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Brendan Danley
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#2 Some kind of snapdragon
snapdragon wild.JPG
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Jessica Gorton
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Location: Central Maine - Zone 4b/5a
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Plant number 1 is Butterfly Weed - Asclepias tuberosa, I'm almost sure. Not sure about number 2.
 
Emilie Thomas-Anderson
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Location: Ben Lomond, CA
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#1 is definitely some sort of asclepias, not sure of the species, though it does look like A. tuberosa as Jessica said.
 
Brendan Danley
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Emilie Thomas-Anderson wrote:#1 is definitely some sort of asclepias, not sure of the species, though it does look like A. tuberosa as Jessica said.


Thank you Jessica and Emilie!
 
Kai Duby
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Location: Colorado~ Front Range~ Zone 4/Wheaton Labs
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food preservation forest garden woodworking
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#2 is most likely Linaria vulgarisUSDA Database = Butter and eggs or toadflax.
It's pretty common throughout the states and it is listed as invasive. In the right conditions it can form a monoculture but most times it's just a small group of them.
 
mitch brant
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Location: Western Pa
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#2 does indeed look like Toadflax, but the leaves don't appear to be single and sessile. Could be the photo or variation in the plant though.
 
Kai Duby
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Nice catch Mitch. I don't think this is toadflax because it doesn't have sessile leaves and the flowers do not appear to be spurred. It's difficult to tell from the pictures though. All of the ID books I have are for the Rockies and a quick glance through a few of them didn't bring up anything resembling mystery plant #2. A location would be helpful. It does look a lot like snapdragons sold in nurseries. Maybe an escapee?
 
Brendan Danley
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Kai Duby wrote:Nice catch Mitch. I don't think this is toadflax because it doesn't have sessile leaves and the flowers do not appear to be spurred. It's difficult to tell from the pictures though. All of the ID books I have are for the Rockies and a quick glance through a few of them didn't bring up anything resembling mystery plant #2. A location would be helpful. It does look a lot like snapdragons sold in nurseries. Maybe an escapee? [

I think it is definitely a snapdragon of some sort. Here is a pic of some new snapdragon (tall-deluxe from bakers creek) flowers that have just started blooming for me. I am also about to get some purple ones.
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Brendan Danley
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as opposed to this picture (not mine) of toadflax
toadflax.jpg
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Brendan Danley
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I didn't plant any seeds for the pic I was trying to ID. That pic was from my farm, 45 minutes away from my house. I'd say it's just an escapee Snapdragon of some sort. Fine by me, better than toadflax!
 
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