Win a copy of 5 Acres & a Dream this week in the Homestead forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Mike Haasl
  • James Freyr
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Kate Downham
  • Jay Angler
  • thomas rubino

Rooftop Gardens - Impervious Tax

 
                            
Posts: 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So I'm moving to Chicago - never lived in a very densely populated city, so I'm excited. Living in Logan Square.

I think I'd like to do something like a rooftop garden, mostly to beautify.

But this DC landlord in this interview said one of her reasons was to combat a tax on impervious surfaces. Wha?! Ever heard of this?

I guess I'd be for it, but I've lived in rural Midwest all my life and have never heard of such a thing.

link to article: http://pushinggreen.com/news/video-go-green-with-rooftop-gardens-3

Thoughts?
 
                        
Posts: 278
Location: Iowa, border of regions 5 and 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

dburkart wrote:
But this DC landlord in this interview said one of her reasons was to combat a tax on impervious surfaces. Wha?! Ever heard of this?



Taxes on impervious surfaces (aka "rain tax") are taxes to be used to upgrade and repair storm sewer systems.  Rain that lands on an impervious surface such as a tarred roof or a parking lot is water that is diverted almost directly into the city's storm sewers and must be treated before it can be released into a river.  Rainwater that lands on soil is water that doesn't reach the storm sewers.

So this is sort of a "use tax" -- the more green on your property, the less water will go from your property into the sewer, and so the lower your "rain tax" will be.
 
                            
Posts: 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hmmm, very interesting. Probably fairly effective for both citizens and the gov.

EDIT: Thanks!
 
Posts: 78
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
just remember they call it Crook county for a reason so be careful up there
 
A wop bop a lu bop a womp bam boom! Tiny ad:
Permaculture Technology Jamboree: June 29th-July 10th, 2020, Wheaton Labs
https://permies.com/wiki/permaculture-tech-2020
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!