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Is this a True Chantrelle?  RSS feed

 
Robert Wilston
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Hello everyone. I am new to the forum and to hunting down mushrooms. I found these yesterday and then started looking on the Internet to help ID them. So far I think they are Chantrelles. I think the dark orange one is a false Chantrelle but again...I am new to this. Can anyone give some insight into what they might be, thank you. Also, I am in the west central Florida region if that helps.
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Judi Anne
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An underneath shot of the dark orange will help.
 
Judi Anne
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Cut the stems in half and show us a picture of the stem middle as well.
 
Judi Anne
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The inside color of the stem is a good way to double check that brighter colored chants are indeed not Jack o lanterns which would be a dangerous mix-up.
 
Robert Wilston
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Thanks...will do. Probably around 6 o'clock my time.
 
Robert Wilston
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Decided I couldn't wait.
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Alder Burns
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Those are both definitely chanterelles! You are in luck! The jack-o-lantern is much larger and always grows on rotten wood or a dead place in a living tree....the only confusing possibility is to find them growing from buried wood or roots. The jacks have deeper, less branching gills. True chanterelles like these have a distinct fragrance, quite unlike most other mushrooms when you get to know them.
 
Judi Anne
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Ok, first, the caveats.... I 've always gathered with experienced folks present to back up my id so I am not as confident as I wish to be. And secondly, I will tell you what I think but I am not saying eat it. Check with an expert or do the spore print to double check your id.

The dark ones look like chants to me. That is the distinctive white stem that looks sort like string cheese. The lighter may be an old one or a different species. I've heard there's more than one, but have only seen one for myself.
 
Judi Anne
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Well, there ya go. Two ayes.
 
M.K. Dorje Jr.
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I agree with Alder, they both look like chanterelles to me, too. The yellow one looks a lot like the Golden Chanterelle, also known as Cantharellus cibarius. The reddish one looks like Cantharellus cinnabarinus, the Red Chanterelle. Judith Browning found a bunch of these a while back, check out her photos:

http://www.permies.com/t/36848/fungi/red-chanterelles-cantharellus-cinnabarinus

Hope this helps.

Oops, looks like recent DNA research has made C. cibarius a European-only species. Here's Michael Kuo, the mushroom expert, on the new classification of the golden chanterelles:

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/cantharellus_cibarius.html

Mushrooms are always getting their names changed!
 
Robert Wilston
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Thanks for all the input. I am fortunate to live on a large ranch in central Florida and have found lots of oak trees that these are under. I think I will also take them to the local extension office to get some more input and local knowledge. Thanks again everybody.
 
Robert Wilston
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What should I look for when doing the spore print?
 
Judi Anne
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The mushroomexpert link in MK's post above has the spore print info.
 
Robert Wilston
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Great...thanks again for all the input. Hopefull in the next few days I should have some good picks with our haul!
 
Judi Anne
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Alder Burns, I'm curious as to why you say jack-o-lanterns are much larger. I've often found jacks smaller than chants. There are other fairly obvious distinctions once you know it such as -usually-growing in clumps, and true gills.

Anyway, I just took the time to check references because your comment keep rolling around in my head. It looks very possible to find similarly sized jacks and chants with the size on jacks ranging from 3-20 cm. http://www.mushroomexpert.com/omphalotus_illudens.html
 
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