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Fredd Marshall
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Hi there,

I just got a fat tax refund and I want to invest in some tools. I'd like to hear some recommendations on what would be good to focus on getting.

What I would like to achieve is getting together the core tools needed to start:

Building with pallets (furniture/garden)
Making things from glass/bottles
Making terrariums
Carving stuff/etching stuff
Making small stoves
Light hard landscaping

As such I am thinking of getting a dremel tool, a circular saw, a bottle cutter, a hammer drill, Chisels, And perhaps a jigsaw.

Is there anything I'm missing, or would be a more suitable/versatile option?

Any help would be appreciated greatly.
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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A sawzall. And my preference is for the one with the cord, not the battery, they have more power, and don't run out of juice. The battery is only for when you are miles from a place to plug it in.

Thekla
 
Will Meginley
Posts: 115
Location: Concord, New Hampshire
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food preservation forest garden hunting tiny house trees woodworking
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Fredd Marshall wrote:
Making things from glass/bottles
Making terrariums
Carving stuff/etching stuff


Delphi Glass is a pretty good internet supplier for most of the glass arts if you don't have a local option.

For stained glass/terrarium making the tool compliments shown in most of the "beginners kits" in that link would give you a fairly good idea what to start out with. I'd buy one or two additional pairs of grozing pliers. I'd also opt for the "pistol" type glass breaker over the "pencil" type shown in most kits, though both work. Plan to spend $200-400 on tools, depending on whether you want to buy a powered grinder or work with handheld grindstones (most emphatically NOT a case where hand tools are almost as fast as the powered alternative).

Etching glass can vary a bit more, depending on the method. Chemical etching is simple and relatively inexpensive. A sandblasting setup will cost you another $400-ish. Either way you can find the stuff there.
 
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