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Fixing up fine sandy loam  RSS feed

 
Dylan Switzer
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Hey everyone,
New member here so please forgive me if this topic has been discussed previously (if it has, a link to the thread would be wonderful)

My wife and I are finally getting things going on our 5 acre parcel of land; We finally have our well finished and our septic is going in this next week(hopefully if everything works out as planned) and we'll be parking our tiny home on it's spot once all that is complete(the mobile tiny home is temporary while I timber frame our future home.) The land is heavily forested but we've cleared around an acre and a half for our future home site, kitchen gardens, greenhouse, chicken coops, food forests but The first thing we need to do before we get into any serious planting is vastly improve the soil which is a fine sandy loam. My plan is to spread a layer of manure/compost over the majority of the cleared land and sow a overwinter cover crop very soon to build up nitrogen and biomass. We also have 3 or 4 large slash piles left over from the land clearing so when I burn those I plan on spreading biochar over the entire area as well.
I'm wondering if anyone can chime in on this and offer up some much needed advice and wisdom as I'm pretty well new to all this.
I'll post some pictures of the land when I get a chance.

Thanks!
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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Sandy soil can benefit from the addition of clay.  If you have a free supply available, consider broadcasting some or incorporating it into each batch of compost. This should help to reduce leaching and your organic material will not gas off as quickly.
 
Dylan Switzer
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Any suggestions for cover crops. I was thinking of a mix of white dutch and crimson clover for nitrogen fixing and attracting beneficial insects and fall rye for chop and drop biomass accumulation
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Have you considered not burning the piles but instead using them for hugelkultur?

 
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