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Larch trees and deer

 
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I am planting larch trees this spring as part of a timber planting. Does anyone have experience with deer browsing on larch?
I am hoping not too have to protect them from animals. Many thanks.
 
gardener
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I'll tell my story with peach trees. I bought very expensive peach trees cause they were tall and I thought the deer couldn't reach up to get the leaves. I was right but still lost half of them. They girdled them getting velvet off the antlers. I think the term is scraping. That was an expensive lesson.

Regardless if they eat the leaves, protect the bark.
 
Akiva Silver
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I'm planting enough (1,000 or so) that some scraping won't be a big deal, it's mostly the browse on larch that I am curious about, especially in the northeast.
 
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In my experience, deer will eat anything if they are hungry. Even things that deer supposedly don't eat. My deer never read the book I guess...

Perversely, my deer seem to have a definite preference for new stuff I have planted.

Anyway, now, all the new transplants get a tree tube. Pretty much eliminates the problem, AND the trees grow noticeably faster. It's a couple bucks per tree. If you buy a hundred, they are $2.25 a pop. Even in low numbers, they are 2.65 ea. I use re-rod for the stake.

https://www.treeprotectionsupply.com/tree-tubes/tree-pro/tree-pro-4-ft/

Maybe your deer aren't as hungry as mine...

 
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Location: Volant, PA
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Yes they do enjoy larch, especially the sapling bark......the larch is really good for their rumen ph in the winter when they are eating less than ideal foods.
 
Akiva Silver
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I was afraid you'd say that.
I was thinking of buying these rigid seedling protectors, they are a lot cheaper than the tubes.
Thanks for the information
 
Chadwick Holmes
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Yeah, sorry.......
 
Troy Rhodes
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What are these inexpensive rigid tree protectors you speak of???

Thanks in advance,

 
Akiva Silver
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I've never tried them before, they don't seem as good as the tubes, but a lot cheaper rigid seedling protectors
 
Troy Rhodes
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Wow, less than a buck each in quantity.

Thanks!
 
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