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oak posts  RSS feed

 
Posts: 15
Location: denmark
1
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hey guys

does anybody know something about wood ??
well I am able to buy some trees which I will cut down and turn into posts but do these oak posts need to dry before I put them in the ground ??
I live in denmark and the ground is wet most of the year.
I somehow remember that once wood has dried beyond a certain degree it will not open up the pores to absorb moist as easy anymore thereafter.
can someone confirm this?? because I kinda wanna use the posts within half a year of me cutting down the trees
we re talking about white oak around 18cm diameter cut into halves and debarked.

thank you very much
 
Posts: 618
Location: Volant, PA
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Kiln dried wood is less accepting of water, but not to the degree that it would be worth your time and money to kiln dry them...

Oak typically lasts about 5-8 yrs in ground, and we are fairly wet here as well. I suggest burying them naturally as most things I have seen tried to waterproof them made them hold water better, the worst being burrying them in heavy plastic water softener salt bags. Just ends up being an individual pool for each post!

Halving them will open the rings to water and shorten the lifespan significantly, the ring is a strength when whole.
 
Posts: 90
Location: Minnesota
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The normal fence post that I used in the Netherlands was acasia wood. From what I heard they lasted quite a while.

Nice oak like those might be longer lasting and great for use in a building if you have one to make.
 
sebastiaan roels
Posts: 15
Location: denmark
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hey guys

already thanks for the replies.
well cutting the posts in halves might not be ideal, but having fence posts of 18 to 30 cm diameter seems like a bit of overkill, it s to keep sheep in not tyranausaurus rexes
and roundwood might be stronger structurally but if you half the posts you expose the hardwood which is much more rot resistant than the outer sapwood. so I m not sure if I agree on this one. and If wood like that is only gonna last 5 to 8 years I m gonna be pretty disappointed!!!
then I also heard many good things about acacia but that doesn`t really grow in the Danish forests so I think oak was my best choice.

 
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