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propagating native trees such as birch, fir, pine, spruce, and aspen

 
Jaime Cameron
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Does anyone know where I can get information about propigating non fruiting trees?
In the area of British Columbia Canada that I live, the loggers are supposed to leave seed trees and replant once they have clear cut.
But around here, where most of the cuts are away from the public eye.
if they leave a seed tree its like one per five acres.
But mostly they clear everything. And IF they replant. It is all monoculture.
So I would like to start planting some of the closer ones myself.
But I don't have a lot of cash money so I would like to learn how to grow my own seedlings.
so far I have not been able to find anything online for non fruiting trees.
Perhaps I am using the wrong search words?
A book would be the best for me.
Thanks all.
 
John Polk
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For starters, try this 31 page PDF http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/AgNatRes/Pubs/Plant_Propagation_Methodologies.pdf
 
Bradley Dillinger
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Location: Cincinnati,OH Zone 6a
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You might also research the fukuoka method of creating mud balls with many species of seeds in them and throwing them out in the field.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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Location: Fraser Headwaters, B.C., Zone3, Latitude 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
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I'm not sure what exactly your intention is. Do I get you correctly that you are planning to go guerrilla plant other trees in tree farm licence land in B.C.?

I'm going to have to go on that assumption, so:

While I appreciate and share your dislike for clear-cuts and the way these things are planted, I do not think that you will make enough of an impact to really change anything, and in fact it might be pointless. I say this because after a block of forest area has been planted, it is maintained to support only those trees, for an extended period of time.

The block of land may not see intervention on an annual basis, but it will be monitored on a basis that is regular to the forest managers and it will have people come in and deal with competing species. Other trees and herbaceous perennials, in later years, that do come up and attempt to get a foothold, are suppressed with toxic chemicals, with manual brushing, with mechanical brushing, or in some rare cases with drip torches. So your plantings might not last long even if you do manage to get a large area planted out. The companies have tenure on this tree farm area and they have a twisted legal precedent to practice their management strategies, and it is a tree farm now-as much as I would like to see a massive paradigm shift in this department as well.

But mostly they clear everything. And IF they replant. It is all monoculture.
So I would like to start planting some of the closer ones myself.


While there are still some monoculture plantations, most clearcuts are now planted with a mixed species crop of softwood conifers for lumber production. While this is definitely not ideal, there are better ways to deal with crappy forest practices then to take guerrilla planting action. Most localities now have a community forest group, for instance, and by joining a group like this, you might have your say as to how an area of forest is managed, and take part in the building of a better system. Also, there may be some stream-bank rehabilitation projects that could use your volunteer drive to do good, permanently. I would suggest looking into other options to pour your activist energy into, but if I haven't convinced you yet...

... if you really want forest seedling trees and plants, the edges of the thousands of miles of older logging roads in your area are full of trees ready to be pulled up, potted, and transplanted.

The best plant propagation book I know is Making More Plants: The Science, Art, and Joy of Plant Propagation, by Ken Druse.

 
Jaime Cameron
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-Roberto.

I really appreciate your comments.
These areas are not licenced tree farms.
It is natural forest still under crown land. The loggers here get a temporary licence to log it then they move on.
Hence the reason many of them don't bother replanting. There are several companies that come into this area, take as much as possible.
Then when they get caught for not finishing with planting. They declare bankruptcy, stay low for a few months then start a 'new' company.

This is all crown or supposedly public land amd so there is no tending after a planting is done. And the pieces I am talking about are way out in the middle of nowhere(where I live)
So the chances of them being planted are very low.
Just wanted to help kick start some growth.

Thank you all for your comments.
 
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