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Cilantro twins

 
Brandon McGinnity
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Location: Winston-Salem, United States
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So I planted some cilantro in pots, to help assuage spring fever. Had to grow something. Anyways, I had a weird thing happen and wanted to see if this was common. I put six seeds in each pot, doing two pots. I figured to thin them later, but wanted to be sure some came up; for some reason I had zero luck growing cilantro last year. Well, they all came up, but out of every seed came TWO SEEDLINGS! I will post photos later, but I'm a little intrigued and a tiny bit weirded out. Is this normal? I could see it happening to one seed, maybe, but 100% of them? I'll post pics later, but... what's going on here? By the way, I'm using Burpee organic cilantro seeds.

Also, I'm new to the forums (first post) though I've lurked around on and off for a good while. Just wanted to say hi!

-Brandon
 
David Livingston
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Location: Anjou ,France
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Hi Brandon
Did these suffer from a quick cold snap ?
Could have killed all the first shoots at the top but each root then set off two replacements

David
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Brandon: You planted cilantro "seed pods". There are two seeds inside each pod.

 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:Brandon: You planted cilantro "seed pods". There are two seeds inside each pod.



Correct. This is the blurb from a commercial supplier:
Regular seed is actually the whole seedpod that contains two or more seeds. For monogerm or split seed, the pods are split open to collect the single seeds. Many growers prefer split seed for precision planting and a higher seed count per pound. Microgreen growers indicate that split seed germinates faster and more consistently.
 
Brandon McGinnity
Posts: 12
Location: Winston-Salem, United States
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Thanks y'all. I didn't know if I got some mutant seed or something, haha. I appreciate the info.
 
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