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What is the root stock for commercial plum trees?

 
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Being on an extremely low, to no-budget-at-all to start my food forest, I managed an end-of-season Santa Rosa Plum tree at Big Lots. It was almost free. Well, between it being poorly cared for at the store, and the city-dwelling deer I didn't know we had, the tree got cut back below the graft. It is doing really well now. I built a wattle around it of mulberry branches. But I am wondering what, if anything, am I likely to get? I have no idea what the base stock of my tree is likely to be. I am hoping there are some orchard folks who can enlighten me. Thanks.
 
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Dave Wilson has a list of common rootstocks for peaches, plums and hybrids.
 
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well theres no way to know for sure because that particular nursery couldve used something uncommon...but most of the time people use a type of prunus cerasifera as a rootstock.

prunus cerasifera is also called myrobalan plum.

this is a wild cherry plum, a little bit more tart and less sweet than a cultivated plum. plus they are small, cherry plums. personally i like them, but i may have a more adventurous palette than yours.

if you still have the tag you could look up the nursery its from, and a lot of have websites or you can find out what they use....
 
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Fedco uses Prunus Americana, and so do I. It works really well.
 
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