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Two Nitrogen Fixers in a Tree Guild

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Hey everyone,

First-time poster... I looked for a bit and didn't see anything immediately about this. Would having two nitrogen fixing plants in one guild improve yield for the other plants? For example, I live in Western Washington and am wondering what would happen if I were to plant red alder, cloves, and dwarf cherries. Would having both nitrogen fixers improve the yield as opposed to one (in the hypothetical non-existing controlled environment)?

Thanks
 
pollinator
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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forest garden solar
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For a starting food forest you want close to 90% legumes and at maturity you want no less than 25% legume after the other 65% has died after being over-shadowed, died of old age or chop-dropped-killed.

Starting out you need 9units of garden space covered/shadowed by legumes for every 1unit of space covered by 'productive plants'
 
steward
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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I'd prefer to have a dozen species of nitrogen fixing trees, that way, when the cold kills one species, and a borer kills a different species, and a blight kills another species, and a relative chops out a "problem tree", and the government bans an invasive, and one species just can't handle the soil, then there are still a half dozen species that are doing fine.

 
Clifford Armstrong Iii
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Thanks for the info everyone!
 
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