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Myco-weeds?

 
Posts: 63
Location: North Idaho, zone 5a
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I know it might sound weird, but could there be such a thing as myco-weeds?
When we bring "mushroom kits", "mushroom patches" or mycorrhizal fungi (= likely non-native mushrooms) to our gardens, could they possibly escape and outcompete native fungi, similar to what invasive weeds do?
There are products on the market that contain more than a dozen of different species of mycorrhizal fungi, plus even more species of beneficial bacteria... Are they safe for the nearby forest, I wonder?
 
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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I'm of the opinion that all species are welcome in my village, regardless of where they were growing last year, or last millennium, or last ice-age.
 
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Paul Stamets has talked about this. He says that frequently, when he collects a mushroom from the forest, he notices a year later or so that it is fruiting on his property. Part of our job when we collect the mushroom is to distribute the spores to places where they might grow. That's one reason why we are suggested by mushroom clubs to never bring mushrooms home in plastic bags. They also rot inside.

Another issue is weed fungi. When you cultivate/inoculate one species of fungi and another takes it over. Happens pretty frequently, sometimes by turkey tail, in which case I make medicine instead of mostly just food.
John S
PDX OR
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
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In my climate, Turkey Tails grow more reliably than any mushrooms that I have tried planting... I suppose that I should be cultivating the Turkey Tails, and give up on other Mushrooms.
 
Wi Tim
Posts: 63
Location: North Idaho, zone 5a
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Peter, do you think the myco-weeds might exist?
 
No prison can hold Chairface Chippendale. And on a totally different topic ... my stuff:
Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
http://woodheat.net
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