• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Anybody tried perennial tripled wheat from Caleb Warnock (Seed Renaissance)?

 
Jason Padvorac
Posts: 67
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just planted some of this:

http://www.mcssl.com/store/calebwarnock/perennial-tripled-wheat

I'm curious if anyone else has had experience with it! I've corresponded with Caleb a little, and he's had plants that have survived and yielded all the 5 years he's been growing it so far, so this sounds like a true, honest-to-goodness perennial. The necessity to leave the straw standing and smaller sized grains probably makes this less adaptable for commercial purposes, but I don't see any problem for home-scale permaculture plantings.

Any thoughts?
 
John Weiland
Pie
Posts: 699
Location: RRV of da Nort
21
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It looks interesting, but I have not tried it. Don't know if the following link is generally accessible: https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/aj/pdfs/104/6/1716

If not, the abstract is below....this being just one study to date comparing a perennial and annual wheat.

ABSTRACT
Perennial wheat (Triticum aestivum L. × Th inopyrum spp.) and perennial rye (Secale cereale L. × S. montanum) are novel hybrid
species under development as alternatives to annual cereal crops. We conducted a 2-yr fi eld study with a split plot design to evaluate
agronomic performance, including yield, phenology, and biomass production, of perennial accessions of wheat and rye, along with
annual analogs. This is one of the first studies to rigorously compare agronomic performance of 2-yr-old plants to 1-yr-old plants
in perennial cereals. Perennial wheat produced 1.0 to 1.6 Mg ha–1 grain yield, 50% of annual wheat (2.7 Mg ha–1), while perennial
rye produced 1.3 Mg ha–1, 73% of annual rye (1.8 Mg ha–1). Modest yields from perennials relative to annuals reflected lower
harvest index, lower yield per tiller, and less kernel mass. One-year-old and 2-yr-old perennial plants had similar seed yields, yield
components, and biomass production, indicating that plant age had little eff ect on these parameters and older plants maintained
yield potential. In contrast, phenology did vary with plant age, and showed a shift toward earlier spring growth and later flowering
dates in older perennial plants. Th is illustrates an expanded vegetative period for regrowing plants of these perennial cereals. Th ere
appears to be potential for producing an early season forage crop from these cereals, although biomass yields were not high at this
site and regrowth was not always reliable. Overall, performance of perennial rye was consistent with a viable new cereal crop. On the
other hand, perennial wheat requires further selection for allocation of biomass to grain and vigorous regrowth.
 
Jason Padvorac
Posts: 67
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks John, that is very interesting and useful!

That link didn't work for me, though I was able to find the full text, open access, here: https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/aj/articles/104/6/1716
 
It's in the permaculture playing cards. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic