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daikon and field pea into weeds

 
Matthew McCoul
Posts: 72
Location: Southeast Michigan
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I'm about to try sowing daikon and field pea in places where I plan to have growing space next year. Clovers, grasses, and wildflowers grow there now. If I scatter the seeds, will they come up through that? Or will have to scratch/scar the area first?

100% germination not required. All my labor is hand, so some loss of seed is worth it compared to too many ours of work on the project.
 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Forage radishes might work,they are naturalized in my yard.
 
chip sanft
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Location: 18 acres & heart in zone 4 (central MN). Current abode: Knoxville (zone 6 /7)
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I tried doing something similar with a variety of cover crops. Field peas managed to make it, at least some, but I had little luck with others. If I were to do it again, I'd do at least some scarring and look for things to expand in year 2 and later.
 
Nicole Alderman
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I tried this also with field peas, oats and daikon radishes. The radishes love to reseed in my soil, the peas not so much (that, and the ducks and bunnies love to eat them). I had pretty good success with sewing the radish seeds on top of mulch and then raking it/tapping the mulch with my metal rake so the seeds fell through the mulch. The oats also seemed to do well with this treatment. But, of course, my ducks loved eating most of those seeds along with the pea seeds. Thankfully they and the bunnies don't like radishes. You could try mowing the wildflowers, etc and then applying your cover crop seeds and agitating the mulch so that the seeds fall through it.
 
Marco Banks
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The better your soil to seed contact is, the more likely you'll get something to germinate and come up. So yes, if you scratch the seed in a bit, it'll be more prone to grow.

Also, the time of year is important. If it's still cool and wet (spring), its more likely that you'll get stuff to germinate if you broadcast it. But once things warm up and get dry, it's a lot harder for those seeds to get established without drying up and dying.
 
Matthew McCoul
Posts: 72
Location: Southeast Michigan
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Thanks for the replies! I cut some sod out in strips across the area.

Gonna broadcast seeds throughout and see how they do on the bare/mulched earth vs into the weeds.
 
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